Tobacco cuttin' time





Here in smalltownland it is time for tobacco to be harvested. Although, around here people refer to it as, "cuttin tobacco". This picture was taken at the state fair. Tobacco leaves were being judged in various states.








Here are some leaves already dried and tied together.







At this time of year what you will most frequently see is tobacco hanging in barns to dry, before it is taken to market. This is called the curing stage. The tobacco is hung from poles that go all the way to the top of the barn. If you are an unlucky sort, you will get behind a wagon load of tobacco being transported from the field to the barn. So unlucky because, on the twisty smalltown roads you might get stuck behind said wagon for a long time before the opportunity arises to pass.







Tobacco barns differ from other barns. The sides have several small doors that open to let in air and this also helps to control the humidity level in the barn. This allows the leaves to cure. Later in October the leaves will be ready to be stripped from the stalk and sorted by the grade of the leaves. After which, it is taken to market.








Growing up, Secret Agent Man raised tobacco with his family. He, and his twin brother, used the profits from their own small tobacco crop to buy their first car. Although tobacco continues to carry a stigma, it is still an integral part of many small, southern towns.

Comments

  1. MAS VISITAS, REGISTRA TU BLOG Y CONSIGUE MAS VISITAS AQUI
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    TAMBIEN APRENDERAS AGANAR DINERO CON TU BLOG

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  2. nice picture bro,
    greetings from italy
    Marius

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  3. Wow, you've got an Italian and a Mexican following you.
    Tobacco farming is becoming a lost art. It's become so commercialized. I miss seeing the little mom and pop farms with their barns bulging with the crop that will sustain them for the year.

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  4. I love your pictures. You are truly capturing life in a small town! Enjoy it while it is still small. They don't stay small forever.

    Michelle

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  5. Loved this post. I use to make good money helping get the tobacco ready to take to the market. Those were the good ole days.

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  6. Marius - thanks for joining us from Italy!

    Dejoni - I am becoming very international. More people actually seem to be growing tobacco this year in our end of the county.

    Tipper - My husband used to make good money working in tobacco, but I am not sure he remembers it too fondly.

    Michelle - Thanks for the comment. I look forward to reading your blog.

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