Tuesday, May 3, 2011

Historic Home Tour Part I

This past weekend I had the great fortune to participate in an historic home tour sponsored by our Smalltownland Arts Council. A lovely group of people who promote historic and artistic endeavors in our small, and incredibly historic, small town.



I have a few homes to share with you and will disperse them over several posts. But, I am going to start with my most favorite. It is the home I find to be the most, "real", of them all. Possibly the most loved by its owners and true in the sense that they work on the house themselves and take great pride in it. They have opened up their home countless time to share its history and architecture.



This house was built sometime between 1840-1850. To give that decade some perspective think about this.....during that time span Abraham Lincoln married Mary Todd. Edgar Allen Poe first published, "The Raven". Florida became the 27th state and rubber bands were patented. Queen Victoria married Prince Albert and Henry David Thoreau moved into his shack on Walden Pond.




Originally this farm was owned by Samuel Brents, who served as a state representative in 1803 and in some years after. He died in 1833 and was buried on this property. Mr. Thomas Waller Lisle was the executor of Mr. Brents' will and came into possesion of the home and farm. Lisle was an attorney and admitted to the bar in 1826. He was also the husband of Brents' daughter.




This structure is known as one of the best Greek Revival houses in the Smalltownland area. The house sits upon a hill overlooking a main road into Smalltownland from the south. It is incredibly striking and even as a small child I would gaze at it in awe as I passed it by on the road.









The interior trim is of a large scale and has been lovingly restored by its current owners, who inherited this house. Yes, it has been passed down through the family all of these years.




The windows are considered to be unusually expansive and have twelve-pane sashes.




Even the furniture in the house are family pieces that have been passed down. This platform rocker is one piece of a set that had been in the family for generations.



The truly favorite part of this house for me was the fact that it is still a work in progress. The upstairs central hallway is under some renovation and you can see a bit of wallpaper on the original plaster.



Not only do the owners take pride in the interior of the house, the grounds are just as lovely. This is a side view of the home with the sidewalk taking you to the front door.


It made me sad to leave, but oh the view...while I walked away with my head craned around to see it.....

37 comments:

  1. Oh, yes, it is a beauty, Farmchick. That rocker is also pretty unusual; at least, I haven't seen one like it before.

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  2. Oh,lucky you to live amongst all that history Farmchick! So you have lived in Smalltownland all your life? I would also not miss out on one single tour. Thank you for sharing this and so looking forward to seeing the rest!

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  3. Good to see the old home being restored instead of being torn down. Looking forward to seeing the rest tour.

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  4. What a beautiful place to visit. I love touring old places like this. I'm glad it's being restored.

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  5. How lovely! I love to visit historic homes. Since I probably will never make it there I appreciate you sharing your field trip :) Can't wait for the rest.

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  6. Beautiful! I think it would be so satisfying to live in a home like that and restore it!

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  7. i'm totally smitten with that rocker! :)

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  8. I love homes with a history. This is still a beautiful one that ~should~ be allowed to live and continue to show its pride! Thank you for showing it and we really look forward to seeing more of them. Hugs!

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  9. Wow..great history..thanks for taking us with you. Look forward to more and like texwisgirl....love that rocker!

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  10. I love history like that! What a gorgeous house and it looks to be in such great shape!

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  11. Loving the history and can't wait for more of the tour. And I really like seeing you on a picture! The class and stateliness of Southern homes is a favorite of mine.

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  12. This is an interesting tour and the beginning is promising with this beautiful house. I love that chair!

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  13. There is so much awesome architecture and history in Kentucky - I love it!

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  14. Thanks SO much for the tour. We are always zippety-doo-dahing through KY to get further south. We really need to get off the beaten trail some time and see what lies beyond the big busy road! Beautiful home! I especially love to listen to Alison Krauss while I'm touring! Very nice touch!

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  15. Amazingly beautiful indeed.

    Please have you all a good Wednesday.

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  16. Lovely...exterior and grounds! And the little piece of floor I could see, in one photo, is excellent! How wonderful that the house is still in the same family!

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  17. This is a beautiful home....love "ancient" homes...with a history!

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  18. I think one of my favorite parts of visiting old homes is getting to walk around the grounds on the old brick paver walkways. My husband and I use to always make time to do at least one home tour a year. Of course, that was prior to having small kids in school and activities. :(

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  19. We will be taking a vacation in Southern Kentucky this fall and we are fascinated with historic town, cemeteries, etc. Is the name of your town actually "Smalltownland" or what small historic community are you posting about with this recent historic home? So very interesting! Love the historic building posts!!!

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  20. Nice little cottage, ha ha. That is really beautiful.

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  21. I love taking tours of old homes. I have been privledged to do so on many occasions. this home is lovely and I am sure you were able to go back in time a few years, by just being inside the home...
    What a beautiful chair...have never seen one quite like it...I have always been impressed as to how important the grounds were to these home owners...Wonderful post and I can't wait to see and hear about more..
    Shug

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  22. Nice reading about the house...the atmosphere is quite enlightening.

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  23. Oh! That must be amazing... to be amid all that history, I would love to spend some time here, any-day!

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  24. If. A lot of "ifs" in the comments. I see myself using them when I see homes like this. And the rocker is a special one, I'd own "if" I had the money.

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  25. All history really begins with local. And people have to work to save and appreciate it. Thanks for sharing.... :)

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  26. I love old homes. How beautiful! I am so glad it stayed in the family and was kept up. Imagine what the land and area was like back when it was built. And, I love the rocker!

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  27. I don't know which is more lovely, the house or the grounds.

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  28. Jack - I also thought that rocker was quite unusual. The owner told me that it was just one piece out of a set of furniture that was divided up amongst the family heirs. I would love to see the other pieces.

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  29. Farmchick -- wonderful that your community Arts Council promotes appreciation of historic structures -- one of which you show in this wonderful post. I will be looking forward to enjoying all that you visited on your tour. -- barbara

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  30. What a spectacular house! In a way the exterior looks very contemporary. It's wonderful tnat the house remains in the same family and that they are able to maintain it so well. A definite treasure! I'm looking forward to seeing more historic homes.

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  31. Interesting history and magnificent building. The interior must take a lot of looking after too to keep the period look.

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  32. Interesting and nice!
    The chair I will remember for a long time.
    Thanks for sharing.

    Gunn / Norway

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  33. Interesting and nice!
    The chair I will remember for a long time.
    Thanks for sharing.

    Gunn / Norway

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  34. This is when houses becomes homes. Love the character of this house. if the walls could talk, the stories this house would tell.

    Velva

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