Sunday, May 22, 2011

Straw Bale Sprouts

Thus far my straw bale project seems to be going smoothly. Everything has sprouted, even the tomatoes. They had been lagging behind just a bit and I was starting to get worried.






I will say that I have had a bit of grass try and grow through the straw bale, but it it very simple to just pluck it out. No garden hoe needed!




A special thanks goes out to Bernie who sent me an encouraging e-mail about starting this garden project. He was even kind enough to send a picture of his tomatoes growing in a straw bale. Thanks Bernie, I appreciated it!




On a different note, our baby birds did not make it. We were all sad that it didn't work out, especially my daughter. But, I found a new surprise in the other fern on the front porch.



It looks to be another Chipping Sparrow nest with just one egg this time. We are hopeful for different results this time.






44 comments:

  1. i'm glad your straw garden is working!

    our wren babies didn't make it either (complications caused by one of our dogs disrupting the nest and me moving it to a higher place and the mother not finding it). i felt terrible!

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  2. Aw, I am SO disappointed about your baby birds. I have a nest of robins and now you have me worried about the neighbor's cat.

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  3. Love how your straw bales are working out, very interesting!

    My fingers are crossed that that sweet hued egg does well.

    ~Andrea~

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  4. I always love looking at all of your gorgeous photos! I just saw the ones with the tin types. I don't have any from my family, but I also love looking around at the antique malls around here and seeing all the neat old photos.

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  5. How wonderful! I love the photo of the nest.

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  6. Love to see your sprouts in the hay bales. Just love that idea.

    Our eggs did not make it either...coons got the Kildeer eggs and we fear the barn cats got the newborn robins. :(

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  7. OH My GOODNESS! This is my absolutely most favorite way to grow things. I first heard about it in Organic Gardener in a 1971!!! Issue...

    The name of the gardener was Ruth Stout..google her and see what they say about her. No hoes, no turning over dirt, no back breaking weeding. (some come through but most pull right out no problem..the problem come in the next year..when the hay sprouts some seed (she used hay not straw) She stated doing it when her husband died (she was in her late 70's!) and she couldn't do the work herself. But she grew almost all her own food...(Her garden was very very big) I wish I could have met her...

    I am so sorry about the baby birds....I think more die then survive...we just don't know about it.

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  8. We have sparrows nesting in our maple tree. Buddy keeps the cats away from the tree so they should be okay....we hope.

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  9. Hope the eggs wil last and give cute baby birdies!

    Leontien

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  10. I am enjoying your posts about straw bale gardening. i think I will be giving it a g in the sumer, here. I also love your new header photos...nice.

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  11. Between the starlings and the cats,I'm afraid our bird watching has not been as much fun as usual.This is our first year to have cats in quite some time. Now that we're older and have the time, we do love bird watching, but we love our cats,too,so we are constantly stressed over the problems that come with loving both.

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  12. Janie - I will most certainly google Ms. Stout. I have not heard of her before, but am intrigued! If this straw bale thing works out this summer, I will be doing it for life!

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  13. I love seeing your new sprouts coming out of those hay bales!

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  14. I am so glad you are seeing good results with your Straw Bale garden. I sent my son your link and he googled it and is considering trying it. I will send him this one too and he can google Ms. Stout too.
    I really hope this little
    Sparrow makes it.

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  15. Hi Farmchick,so sorry about your baby birds. I also think a lot of them die,it's amazing that all these little birds do manage to reproduce! Your straw bale garden is fascinating to follow,I am also going to google Ms. Stout now.

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  16. Looks like a very interesting way to garden - and certainly less back-breaking. Hope your birdie makes it.

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  17. Sorry for the baby birds, but it seems that new surprises keep coming!

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  18. Looks good. That is a neat idea. Sorry about the birds.

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  19. I am very curious to see how the haybale gardening works throughout the growing season. I hope you post pics periodically.
    Sorry about the birds. Darn it!! I'll keep my fingers crossed for the new nest.

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  20. I'm so excited about your straw garden!

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  21. I'm so excited about your straw garden!

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  22. Oh, I'm sorry about the birds...Funny, I'm heading to town today to get some straw for the garden.

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  23. I'm so excited the straw bales are working for you. I want to add some more plants, but don't have the money or space for any more squares. I could fit in a few bales though.

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  24. I love the straw garden...I'm glad to see everything growing!

    A new nest...wonderful!

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  25. What a fabulous coloured egg.

    I don't have room for a straw bale on my London balcony. But it's an interesting idea and I'll read back thru your blog to see if there's a way of adapting it.

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  26. Love these sprouting pix. I can't wait to finish planting my garden. We keep getting rain;0(

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  27. The Straw garden is a good idea I would think it would keep the soil warm which would help.
    shame about the baby birds, paws crossed for the other nest.
    Have a good week
    See Yea George xxx

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  28. I love how the hay bale garden is coming out!

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  29. I can't sell this idea to my farmer yet. We are still discussing the difference between hay and straw. He says it's not cost effective. I told him the bales last for more than one year and that piqued his interest. Maybe by next year. I really want to do it.

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  30. I have questions about the straw bale garden! I want to start one as my traditional vegetable garden is full. Plus it will be warmer soil and more protected I think on the wide open prairie. Do you have mice in it or do you think that would be a problem? That is my hold out I why I haven't planted one yet. I am intrigued, excited but don't want mice.

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  31. It's good to see everything sprouting so well, but sad to hear about the baby birds. My son was excited to see a robin had laid three eggs in a nest over his backdoor light but in a couple of weeks she abandoned it. Perhaps she didn't realize it was an actively used door when she laid her eggs there. He put up a box on his garage in hopes another bird will build a nest there where there is less activity.

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  32. It's always so rewarding to see those first sprouts come up!

    love the little nest...hope the birds have better luck than the last!

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  33. Seems like your sprouts are coming up fast....This could turn out to be a big thing for you...
    Always enjoy visiting your blog..
    Have a great evening..
    shug

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  34. I have the same worry about mice that Katie has, but I am so intrigued with this idea! Can't wait to see how it continues to grow!

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  35. This is really intriguing to me. The thought of not having to deal with weeds is particularly appealing. :) I'm interested to see how everything turns out!

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  36. So sorry the baby birds didn't make it. Hope you have better luck with the new egg.
    Your hay bale garden is looking good!

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  37. So sorry about the baby birds. They are so small and there's so much against them -- it's a wonder.

    Glad you are enjoying your straw bail garden. Looking good! :)

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  38. hah! didn't figure you'd be offended by water guns ;-)
    love your egg photo, too bad about the other nest. What is this about hay bale tomatoes? totally curious now...

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  39. Your straw bale raised garden beds are an excellent idea! And when that straw rots down at the end of the growing season you can add it to another area of your garden to add more organic matter.

    I like it!

    ..and I love your blog!

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  40. Hey, Chick! Glad to see your new gardening technique is working. Keep us posted. So, are you about done with school for the year. We have two more days with students and then we begin some PD days. Whew...can't wait for summer.

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  41. Daffodil - That is the plan for the bales when I am finished with them. Thanks for reading!

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  42. Katie - During my research I didn't read anything about mice being a problem. I have these sitting out in the garden/field area. Hopefully mice won't be a problem, but I will post about all of the pitfalls/bonuses as I go along with this project.

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  43. your plants look good coming up. I am sorry about the birds, too. Unfortunately, that happens all the time. We have lost some in our yard, too. What is sad is that sometimes other birds are the culprits.

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  44. We have a tomato bed that is filled with the dirt and decay from underneath a spot where hay is fed to cattle- it is fantastic! So I am anxious to try this straw bale method- anything that keeps me upright instead of bent over pulling weeds!

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