Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Perryville

Maybe a couple of times a year I have the opportunity to pass through the historic town of Perryville, Kentucky.  It really sprang to life in the late 1830's when shops began to line the historic merchants row, which still stands today. It also saw the Battle of Perryville in October of 1862.  This battle, which ended the Kentucky Campaign of two Confederate Generals, is still reenacted each year close to the town. 


Harmonia College was one of a handful of women's institutions located in the area back in the day.  One of its more famous graduates was Carrie Nation.  Known nationally as a leader of the temperance movement, Ms. Nation left her mark in this area by initiating the beginnings of the local option. 

Regional vernacular would refer to local option as a "wet" or "dry" county.  Each county votes whether or not to sell alcohol.  A charged issue in our area still today. 

Merchant's Row is still available to browse with Itchy Dog Antiques being the best name ever for an antique shop.  Just sayin'. 


If the dear Ms. Carrie Nation were to visit this town today, I doubt she would find it much changed.  Bricks still line the walkways and the pace is still slow.  With a population hovering around the 800 mark, how could it be anything else?
This is one of the few places where I can snap a picture of wavy window pane, while really trying to capture the stuffed chicken sitting on the upper shelf. 

History....it's all around us.  Just make your husband stop the car so you can run around and take pictures of it. 

32 comments:

  1. Loved this! I agree that name is the best ever for a Antique Shop!!

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  2. Perryville is a wonderful old town. We have so many here in Kentucky and across the nation. We should all take the time to visit a few. Thanks for your lovely post.

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  3. Love the old, historic towns. Used to visit some in my U.S. days. Daydreaming about who, what, where, when in all those wonderful buildings. Itchy Dog Antiques is original all right. Appropriate for an historic town when back then lap dogs were used to attract the fleas instead of bothering people. Or, was that earlier times?

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  4. I will take a sleepy ole town any day over the hustle and bustle of a big city. I have never been in your part of the country...one day I hope.

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  5. Totally agree with you regarding 'living history'. It's alive and well in all the small towns that have maintained their 'main streets' of yesteryear. This blog entry reminds me of the artist James Lumbers.

    Imagine if you will the goings on that place on Main St. in Anyplace town 100 years ago.

    <a href="http://proxychi.baremetal.com/artcountrycanada.com/images/lumbers-on_the_beat.jpg</a>

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  6. thanks for the tour of this quaint place. laughed at the hubby line. :)

    we have some areas of dallas and burbs going 'damp' - selling just beer and wine but no hard stuff. :)

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  7. I always love hearing tid bits of info about history and sights around blog friends stomping grounds, thanks!

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  8. Great pics that capture the feel of the place.

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  9. i love the way you highlight the beauty and history of the area you live in - it makes me feel good to know that small town america still lives....and thrives. the foundation of this country.

    p.s. the wavy window shot is a real fave....but i can't see the stuffed chicken!! will have to embiggen the image..... ;-)

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  10. I need to take pictures of a town near us called Spring Valley. Population of a hundred or so. They are getting ready for a potatoe festival. Town grows by the thousands. Sits in a valley and on a hill. Had a ski slope at one time, only one in southern Ohio.

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  11. Hah! The 'stopping your husband' part can be the most difficult aspect of this venture!
    Love the photos, and the commentary. It most certainly makes me want to visit....
    Dream on, Anne :)

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  12. Very cute place to visit, thanks for the tour.

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  13. Really liked the tour and the photos are fine! We have a historic district that runs along the same lines but I haven't managed to properly explore it yet. Maybe I should make a point of doing so.

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  14. Therein lies the secret....lol....getting him to stop!!
    Great shots.

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  15. Your photos capture the simple beauty of small towns that remain as they were years ago.

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  16. what a fairy-tale you live in...

    please have you all a wonderful wednesday.

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  17. Sounds like a great place and you certainly captured it with your stories and great pictures!

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  18. What a great little town! Love the photos.

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  19. This post made me smile. I have a feeling I would be right at home in Perryville. :)

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  20. I'd like to, Farmchick, but I don't have a husband. (Nice series from a lovely old town that seems very serene.)

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  21. Nice historical post. Would love to visit that antique store.

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  22. I just love your blog...lots of good information and always beatiful pictures...Good job..
    shug

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  23. Itchy Dog Antiques... now that sounds like a place the gals and I would enjoy...

    Dann in Ohio

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  24. Some very interesting pictures really without time. My favorite is the last one, I have a soft spot for windows and their content...

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  25. What intriguing old buildings :-) Itchy Dog is a great name.

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  26. You are SOOOO lucky you have a husband that will stop and let you snap shot this gorgeous history!

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  27. Hope you found lots of antiques in town -- barbara

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  28. I adore old towns.. I go back to visit my hometown every 5 years.. Watonga, Oklahoma. It's struggling to keep alive, but I still love it.
    ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  29. Congrats on your photos being in Mature Living magazine!

    Wonderful historiuc town. I love the antique store name...lol I've heard the "wet and dry" description used in Wildwood NJ -- Wildwood Crest is "dry" as it is a more family oriented beach area

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  30. I'm surprised that they managed to get any customers in the antique shop with a name like that. I would just want to scratch. The vote on alcohol reminds me of my trip to Port Sunlight, no doubt a highly emotive issue in both places.

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