Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Straw Bale Cold Frame

Though it is still technically winter, spring is just around the corner.  My plan was to start some seeds early this year in a cold frame made out of leftover straw bales from last summer's garden project.  Well....squash bugs invaded my garden and I destroyed the straw bales, due to any possibility of eggs with the new season.  

Secret Agent Man surprised me yesterday with a few new bales and he set them out for the cold frame.  

The bales cost a few dollars and the old windows were free from a friend.  I have some seed trays that will be placed into the cold frame in the near future.  A thermometer will be going into the cold frame this week, so I can begin to monitor the temperature. 

Other ideas for cold frames can be found here and here.....and by a quick search with our friend, Google.

Anyone out there had success with this project?  

36 comments:

  1. My husband did cold frames a few years back - they did okay.

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  2. i love the feel of your blog!
    Check out mine: http://veggievictualia.blogspot.com/

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  3. You are on the ball!!!
    Hubby made me a raised bed recently. I am so excited. (Now I think I need a little (woman sized tiller) ha

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  4. we tried them but they didn't work very well

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  5. Although, I haven't needed a cold frame in the caribbean, I like this idea with the straw bales. If ever we move back up north, this is an idea to keep.

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  6. Oh! I am SOOOO ready to garden!!! I love your cold frame!

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  7. Not exactly the same but similar I suppose. My father used to keep the summer garden going well into winter. In the fall he would bag the leaves and before the ground froze, he'd cover the garden with bags of leaves 3 rows high. All the root veggies kept growing although much slower. He'd harvest some fresh carrots to go with Christmas dinner. Notably tastier carrots!

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  8. I've never tried this before, I hope it works for you this year.

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  9. your blog was the first time i had heard of the straw bale garden technique last year. this is new to me, too.

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  10. I'm going to investigate if there's something similar I could use on my patio to overwinter some veggies...like onions and lettuce!

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  11. Cool! I've got a plant lamp that I'll be starting some seedlings with eventually. I totally forgot about it last year. Thanks for the heads up for spring!

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  12. A nice, useful and unexpensive surprise!

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  13. No, I have never seen this before, but I am using straw bales to grown things in this year, thanks to you!

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  14. You're starting early! Hubby bought cedar boards to make us some raised beds.. can't wait. But it's still full out winter here. Hurry Spring! ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  15. I haven't done this. On the other hand, our grocery store has wonderful vegetables . . .

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  16. We are planning on using the bales this spring and already have some old windows..I can hardly wait to see how it goes. Good idea for the thermometer, I will do that too. xo

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  17. Good luck with your seeds and garden. I just want a decent "crop" of tomatoes this year. For the past two years mine have not produced very well.

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  18. I had great dreams of straw bale gardens last year but it didn't happen. I got too worried about mice! Keep me posted with the cold frame concept and I may be inspired in our late spring!

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  19. This looks like an easy project to try! Anything to get an early start!
    Happy Planting!

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  20. Great concepts......Happy gardening...

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  21. Right on! Spring is just around the corner and what a fantastic idea to get a jump on it too. When it's cold out i simply start my seed indoors as our cold is not nearly as cold as yours. Good luck i'm sending you long distance wishes for a big bountiful harvest this year.

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  22. Great way to get a jump on Spring!!

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  23. Very ingeneous. I'd say good luck. My success with cold frames has been minimal, the basic problem being my short attetion span. Apparently I'm a follower of Ron Somebody whose motto, when selling slo cookers was "set it and forget it." :)

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  24. I've never seen them above the ground like that... in Colonial Williamsburg they have a dug out one that they cover with glass, I'll have to try to get a photo. But in Wisconsin they would also do dug out garden starters, people would use old cabinet doors to sort of frame out the interior against the dirt and then old windows or old glass doors to cover... they usually did really well.

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  25. Good luck with your garden, I thought maybe you were going to use those frames for an antiquing project.

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  26. Neat idea. We had an old double wash tub we use to start plants in. Have it on the south side of the house with a heavy clear plastic top on it. Already have some lettuce growing in it.

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  27. They look great! I just came across from the link on the Homestead Revival. I'm going to look around now and see if there are any posts detailing how this worked! :)

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