Wupatki Pueblo


On our last day in Arizona, we visited my favorite place, the Wupatki Pueblo.  First described in 1851 by Lorenzo Sitgreaves, Wupatki is thought to have been started in the 1100's.  A large influx of people moved into the area after the eruption of the Sunset Crater, between 1040-1100.   This volcanic eruption blanketed the area with ash, thus improving the agricultural conditions.  During its heyday, Wupatki Pueblo housed up to 100 people. 



A kiva still remains at this site. Kiva structures were either above, or underground rooms used for ceremonial purposes, in the pueblo culture.  



The rooms still showed where fires would have been placed and food stored. 




This picture shows the remains of the ball court.  Used for games and sport, I can tell you that it was a pretty interesting feeling to walk into the court and stand in the middle. 






Although this last shot seems quite unglamourous, it really is a unique geological feature.  This stone square houses a blowhole.  Perfectly cooled air flows straight out of this hole in the ground.  The Sinagua, descendants of the Hopi at Wupatki, did not use this for any type of heat relief.  Instead, it was likely that they viewed this as sacred area. 


During our visit we ventured to the nearby Wukoki pueblo where we were able to wander in and out of very small pueblo rooms.  While in one room we were caught in a wild dust devil created by a strong wind that blew out of nowhere.  

Nearby historical/archaeological markers informed us that one had to be invited to enter a family's pueblo. My daughter told us we had not been invited and we needed to leave. 

There you have it.   

Comments

  1. What an amazing place! Thanks for sharing the history and the pictures!

    Sarah from The House That Ag Built

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  2. so cool. i'd love to stand on such ancient (and holy) ground.

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  3. That is so beautiful. Looks like you had a great trip.

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  4. Good pictures and great explanation of what we were looking at, I appreciate all the information it made it very interesting.

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  5. Oh I am so glad you posted this. Incredible architecture. I bet your family keeps this trip in their hearts for the rest of their lives.

    Lol and btw, I was "relieved" that that blowhole was not a potty lol. For a nanosecond, I just KNEW it was a totally different kind of structure, and anything BUT a sacred place lolol.

    Loved the photos. Keep 'em coming.

    In Him,
    Grace

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  6. Awesome!
    Have a great weekend :)

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  7. An interesting place and excellent photos, as always.

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  8. wow ! I should really go visit there !

    XOXO
    Alexandra Marie

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  9. A long time ago. Did you try to imagine life there, try to imagine voices?

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  10. Awesome Michelle, that ball court is unbelievable! Kids have a feel for these kinds of things....

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  11. Wow! I would love to visit such a gorgeous place. Gorgeous photos, as always!!

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  12. LOVED this post. This is a place I haven't been and now you've inspired me.

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  13. Beautiful and so interesting, Michelle. Thank you.

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  14. History about other people from long ago is always so interesting. I would love to visit the Wupatki Pueblo and imagine how life must have been for them.

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  15. What an interesting place, thank you for sharing your experiences there with these beautiful photos.

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  16. Historical and beautiful. Thank you so much, for including us on your trek. Fascinating indeed.
    BlessYourHeart

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  17. Thank you for this journey through time and space. Exiting indeed.


    Please have you all a good Sunday.

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  18. I have enjoyed your holiday posts from Arizona, what a stunning place. It is my number one place to visit. One day I hope I get to go
    Jan

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  19. i admire your daughter's sensitivity to these archaeological remains. i love the area around sedona and clearly this land has been held sacred for centuries. what beautiful images you have captured.

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  20. Pictures are gorgeous. Sounds like a great place to visit!

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  21. What a neat place. Great photos and history.

    Darryl and Ruth :)

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  22. What a wonderful place! When hubby and I travelled down into Mexico when I was 19, we found an old abandoned and crumbling adobe place and I posed in the still standing door arch.. loved that feeling of being there. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  23. Does it make you want to write a story set there? Thank you for taking us along with you. xx

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  24. This was fascinating to see, and so well preserved.

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