Tuesday, August 28, 2012

It's My View

I am sure that most of you must think that all I ever see are fields of corn, tobacco, and tall grass. Barns, dogs, and kids often fill my posts. But, this picture is the real deal. I pass through this caution light leaving my farm to drive into Smalltownland civilization. 

The intersection, and the surrounding buildings, have been here since I was a kid spending time during summer break hanging out with my grandparents. And, to hear my Grandma Bird tell it, this intersection was here when she was a child and her dad owned the blacksmith shop not too far away. 




Farmers pass under the flashing light many times a day.  The morning school bus can really clog up traffic here as well.  If you call a line of five cars traffic.....

It isn't fancy and it certainly isn't modern, but it provides a sense of comfort in this Farmchick's small town routine. 


37 comments:

  1. Well, that looks quiet. I just went through an hour of traffic congestion just now ! Enjoy the quiet life, it is a luxury to most people !

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  2. i love this! and i love even more that you live in the same town as you did as a child...how special to get to hear your grandmother's stories too of this great little town! now-a-days, too many people are busy moving around, no real roots to anyplace, and i'm one of them...i would have loved to grow up in a small town and still live there!

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  3. I would really like a line of only five cars!

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  4. I love it. Rural Kentucky at its best. We have such a wonderful sense of history :)

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  5. I can relate to school bus traffic jams..and 5 cars in that jam!

    Love the shot!

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  6. I love reading about and seeing your small town charm.

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  7. You know how to make a girl envious, don't you?? (sigh). If I could convince DH, I'd live in a place with a caution light like that.

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  8. Hi Michelle, There is something special about the beauty of a small town. City slickers (like me) talk up the big city, but we love the peace and gentleness of getting back to a small town. Thanks for sharing your location with us! Have a great day, John

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  9. I am so jealous right now. You have the best of both worlds, farm and field, and a small, blink and missit' town. I love it.
    BlessYaGirl

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  10. This looks like Loradale, Ky,, where I live. We don't have a caution light because too many people thought it would cause a problem. A stop sign only, and we are still having our 3 or 4 fender binders a month. We have to have something to talk about.

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  11. A small town picture that captures the essence of small town life and its charm.

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  12. Aren't small towns great? Sharing the 'history' of this town with your Grandparents makes it very special. A 5 car traffic jam is plenty for me, too! xx

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  13. Cool! You make me feel like such a city girl!

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  14. i love this. just as it should be.

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  15. It's nice to see a city life post. Looks like rush hour.

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  16. Our town is abit bigger than yours, Michelle -- but alot smaller than what I grew up in and I love it. :)

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  17. Oh lol, I'll trade it for my kilometres of first gear trudging in greater Paris! ;-)

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  18. Coming from a very small town myself I find it to be INCREDIBLY charming!

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  19. It's the kind of lifestyle perfect for bringing up kids. :)

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  20. Such a sweet little town...I remember when our town used to be like that.

    And to think, the town has grown so much that we even have a Sonic!

    Have a good day.

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  21. oh what joy ! many times one can smell, and even taste, rush hour over here. while having windows at home open. please have you all a good wednesday.

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  22. That reminds me of Watonga, Oklahoma where I was born and where I return about every 5 years for a visit and family reunion. I now live in a small town in Oregon.. the countryside is the "only" place to live, as far as I'm concerned. Gotta have me some ground of my own. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  23. This is a very different life that what I am used to, Michelle, but when I head out to Colorado I might get a taste of the country life...or at least suburbia! :)

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  24. Yes it gives a good sense of how life is in your small town....good pic.

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  25. I can relate. It's why we left the big city and spent most of our adults lives in rural smalltown Mn.

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  26. Rural America, isn't it great and aren't you lucky. Simple history, I just love it..

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  27. That makes me smile...we had one just like it when I was growing up as well...AND my Great grandfather was the town's blacksmith. :-)

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  28. wow you have a light...the little farm communities I grew up in and have lived in since didn't have even a caution light! rural life is very different from living in the city...so much I love about it...so much I miss and will never experience again!

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  29. Small town life is wonderful! We don't even have a stop light in my town! LOL!!!

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  30. This reminds me of my youth.
    When I was taking Drivers Ed, we had to drive 45 minutes away to get to a town that had a traffic light to practice going through a traffic light.
    I had to drive around the block four times to finally hit a red light.
    It was the only traffic light in that town.
    I am moving up in the world because I currently live 35 minutes from a town with a traffic light:)

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  31. Familiar surrounding and familiar ways is extremely comforting. Very cool.

    Velva

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  32. Love small towns- wouldn't trade for anything.

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  33. Reminds me of the town where I grew up.

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  34. I can relate - our town (village ?) is so small, we don't even have a flashing light ! And we don't have a rush hour - it's called a rush minute ;>)

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