Passion Flowers

Late Sunday afternoon, Secret Agent Man was out and about on the tractor. Really his favorite thing to do. He saw me outside and started yelling/waving/pointing at a field. Thought he needed help, but really he was showing me that he had found some, "purple flowers", as he put it, growing along a fence row. 




As it turned out they were Passion Flowers and they were everywhere in the field.  



Passion Flowers grow wild on a vine, throughout the southern United States.  Previously, I found a solitary flower growing next to an old pond, but never this many together.  The vines had grown through weeds, sticks, and the general wildness of the field. 






Named for The Passion of the Christ, the ten petals represent the ten apostles.  The three secondary calyx leaf bracts represent the Holy Trinity and the filaments represent the crown of thorns.  Also, the three stigmas equal Christ and the two thieves on the crosses. 





Also known as Maypop and Wild Apricot, Passion Flowers come in several different colors and petal shapes. The vines also produce an edible fruit that grows to the size of a chicken's egg.  The dried leaves of the Passion Flower have historically been used as a treatment for insomnia and epilepsy. 





Legend states that when placed in the house, the Passion Flower can calm problems and bring peace.  If placed under the pillow, it can bring sleep.  If carried by a person it attracts friends and brings popularity.

Although they are a common wildflower vine in my area of the United States, I was astonished to find such beauty in my own backyard. 


Comments

  1. Isn't that amazing to find these in your field. What a treat. :)

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  2. Wow, what a cool find. I never knew all those facts about them!

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  3. Gorgeous...I've never seen one before! We must be too far north.

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  4. Hi Michelle, Great shots! I'm sure I've seen this flower before but this is a first for such a great close-up as in that second photo. Very interesting! John

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  5. I don't think I have ever seen them in person. So beautiful...and thanks for telling us about them.

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  6. Such coolness for such simple beauty to hang out with the mundane.

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  7. aren't they pretty...they had some at the zoo...they reminded me of ballerinas...Hotrod thought so too...

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  8. I never knew they were the same as maypops!! I'd always heard Mama talk about maypops but didn't have a clue what she was talking about. Turns out, just before she died, they showed up by the dozens in her overgrown garden plot. Thanks for the info. And the bees and hummers love them.

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  9. they're so beautiful! have never seen them in person, though. i think i'd like to place some in my pocket, under my pillow AND around my house! :)

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  10. I love your stories about the Passion Flower. It makes a beautiful flower have texture, history and legends. Amazing that so much can rise among the weeds and cling so beautifully to a vine. Thank you for sharing:)

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  11. How exciting, I had no idea that they grew wild in the U.S.!

    I love the story about it, how very special to have it 'planted' on your land, just for you to enjoy. xo

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  12. That second photo needs to be on my wall somewhere. Also, I love it that all the parts of the flower have such poignant meanings and tell a story.

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  13. Wow...I must get some of these flowers and place them under my pillow. they are strange looking, but very pretty...
    Hugs,
    shug

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  14. Isn't it sweet that your big, strong 'Secret Agent Man' knew you would love seeing these beautiful flowers! Love that. It is so amazing that they grow wild and I love the story of how they got their name. I grew one that I bought in a pot a few years ago, but of course it only survived the summer here. Every flower was a cause for celebration. They are so gorgeous. Lucky you! xx

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  15. So pretty....aren't you glad he pointed them out.....

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  16. What an adventure. Thank you for teaching about the meanings. Please have you all a good Wednesday.

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  17. Thanks for the explanation behind the name, I had wondered. Within the same family of flowers we grow the fruiting passionfruit on our pool fence. The flower has slightly different colours but the same structure. We have a few last passionfruit still on the vine now.

    Your first photo shows the scene delightfully.

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  18. Those really are beautiful. What color, loved them. And great legends too associated with the flower.
    Have a wonderful week ahead Michelle :)

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  19. How pretty, I've never seen them in New England! Hmm, I'll have to look closer!!!

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  20. Aren't they beautiful and so aptly named :)

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  21. You are sooOOooo lucky to have such an incredible tropical flower growing wild on your property! They are one of the most beautiful flowers EVER!
    ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  22. Beautiful! The first picture with the field is perfect I love them all.
    Mine have been few and far between this year. And a BIG high fives to 'Secret Agent Man' for sharing his find he's a keeper.. hugs, Cherry

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  23. I have never seen a flower like this, but I am relly ignorant on the matter. It is beautiful and has a story...

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  24. what a beauty. luv the color. neat find.

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  25. i don't think i've ever seen one before...i love the legend!

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  26. What a beautiful flower I could use some of that under my pillow right now:) B

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  27. They are pretty, Michelle. I don't think I have seen these before.

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  28. Bellas fotos y muy interesante blog. Me encantó descubrirte. Un abrazo.

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  29. These grow on my acreage and I've never known what kind of flowers they were...until now! Thank you! Beautiful shots.

    Lana

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  30. I've seen tis flower in Botanical Gardens but never knew the interesting meaning of it's name!

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  31. i think the passionflower is one of the most unique looking flowers! gorgeous colors...
    really nice pictures.

    we have them growing wild here too...and in the field across the street, i've never made anything of their fruit...but i have thought about it! they are healthy...like u said. one of these days i'll get around to it!!

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