March Lilies



Here in Smalltownland everyone calls them March Lilies. You, however, may know them as Jonquils or even Daffodils. As a child I even called them Buttercups. Whatever the term of endearment, they arrive here in the month of March. Heralding the arrival of spring, even if there happens to be a flurry of snow in the air.





Also in Smalltownland there is a field that becomes engulfed in them each spring.  A field that has spent at least a couple hundred, allowing these flowers to grow at will.  





This home, built between 1810 - 1825, still stands in our town as an example of the Federal architectural period.  Though it has had some additions of a gabled roof and porch, the interior boasts original chair rails, corner cupboards, an open stairwell, and pilastered mantels.  






It also boasts a famous inhabitant.  Arriving from Faquier County, Virginia in 1803, Richard Buckner went on to become one of our prominent, early politicians.  Going on to serve as a state senator, congressman, and a candidate for governor in 1832.  

On the property are over 20 graves.  Some are unmarked and some have stones with engraving that is not so legible.  




It is known that two children were buried in this area.  Last year, around this time, I heard a local legend that stated the March Lilies began in the field after the children were buried.  

These Grape Hyacinths were also growing wild around the grave stones.  



This time the March Lilies don't seem to be in bloom all at once.  The top half of the field is covered, but the lower half is just waiting to bloom.  If you look closely, there is a girl, with a basket sitting in the field in front of the house.  





So, today a bit of history and a mystery of just how this all began.

"History is a gallery of pictures in which there are few originals and many copies." 

Alexis de Tocqueville   


Comments

  1. very familiar with those blooms. so beautiful. & springy too!!! ( :

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  2. Morning Michelle, love the History lesson.....What a wonderful house but the flowers are amazing, love Daffodils, beautiful....Thanks, needed to see flowers about now, Francine.

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  3. I love them we called them butter cups when I was little also

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  4. Cool house, and the stories it could tell.

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  5. I like this beautiful combo of history and yellow.

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  6. Good Morning Michelle....
    Great post...I enjoyed the history as well as the beautiful home and flowers. have a blessed day

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  7. How I envy your springtime! Very pretty countryside.

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  8. just love the daffies! what a bittersweet piece of history/lore to link it to the children.

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  9. Beautiful! I think our Easter will be hiding eggs in snow banks rather than under flower pedals...

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  10. So someone lives in the house, I hope? And what lucky people they are to see that out their window.

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  11. Gloriously beautiful. God makes no junk!

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  12. Oh I love mysteries and this one has to be the MOST beautiful one I have seen. B

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  13. Beautiful all...the March Lilies, the grave sites the house...we are having BITTERLY cold temps today...(due to windchill) and I fear we are not close to seeing any early spring flowers QUITE yet.

    Love the photos.

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  14. i just love brick homes - and so happy that i finally own one...

    those bulbs were once planted by hand by someone who had hopes and dreams of the future - and nature took over. That is absolutely beautiful

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  15. LOVE that house and field of daffodils!
    ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  16. Beautiful images of colorful flowers!

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  17. Soooo gorgeous! I love seeing daffodils (that's what I call them!) growing all over the place like that. One of my favorite times of the year.

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  18. very pretty and I've never heard the name March Lilies. Some years ours would have to be called April Lilies. ha. I think mine will barely make it blooming in March this year!

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  19. Good evening Michelle, do you know I have never heard the term "March" lilies. I have so enjoyed reading this post and viewing your lovely photos. Is this home a private residence? How wonderful to look forward to this beautiful view each spring. Greetings from snowy Maine, Julie.

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  20. Sigh... :-)Such a pretty sight, a sea of them!

    I've always called them daffs, buttercups to me are tiny little yellow flowers.

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  21. These are gorgeous! I can't wait to start seeing some around here! :)

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  22. Florida Farm Girl - The house is being lived in and has always retained the original interior.

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  23. Dog Trot Farm - This home has always been maintained as a private residence.

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  24. Our spring flowers haven't bloomed yet, they are just started to bud. I love spring flowers and I can't wait until they come out. Great photos!

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  25. Those are SO pretty, Michelle. And don't forget "narcissus." I once planted a bed of daffodils with bulbs I got from White Flower Farm, a Connecticut garden center that does a thriving mail order business. It was terrific until I ran out of time to do the weeding and it got a bit overgrown. So, I had it mowed down and grassed over, but every year I still get a wild display of daffodils on that spot until I have it mowed again in June.

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  26. I just love that you know the history of the places in Smalltownland, it's so interesting. The Daffodils are beautiful!

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  27. What a beautiful place and history to go with it! Love the last photo of the girl with the basket. Love the quote, too! xx

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  28. oh i enjoyed this post with all the history...i was going to ask if it's a private residence but i see that in your comments. beautiful fields of daffodils! they're coming up here all over the place too!

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  29. This looks like a neat place to explore. I'd never have guessed that house was so old.

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  30. Very interesting. I just love history. I'd want to do the same thing, sitting in the flower field with my basket.

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  31. Hi lovely lady.
    I also love that house and field of daffodils! Thanks so much for posting for us, hope you have a wonderful week with your family.
    XXOO Diane

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  32. The magic of daffodils! It's still in my future.

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  33. Love these signs of SPRING!

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  34. Beautiful scenes. Our daffodils are still buried under two feet of snow. Still a beautiful boquet rests on our dining room table a gift from my wife Kiwanis Club...

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  35. before I forget (and before I read your post), I wondered if you knew what had happened to Robert and his Daily Athens Photo blog...I was disheartened to discover it was no longer available

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  36. what beautiful names for a beautiful flower...love them, love their scent...so full of the delights of spring

    such a beautiful old home...and the mystery about the cemetery and the flowers is very interesting

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  37. What a beautiful home and setting!

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  38. The hillside covered in daffodils is so lovely. We called them buttercups when I was growing up, too. And grape hyacinths are always so fun with their chubby little blooms. Thanks for sharing spring!

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  39. Oh wow! This is amazing! We call them daffodils. I love the story about the children's grave. I missed daffodils in Vegas. In Missouri they seem to grow wild. I love seeing them. Great photo's! Thank you for sharing!

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  40. Beautiful, beautiful spring flowers!!!!! And love the story -- barbara

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  41. Love them, Beautiful flowers . Have a nice day

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