The Laura Plantation

By far....for me anyway, the most meaningful thing we did while in the New Orleans area was visit the Laura Plantation. 

A true Creole plantation as founded by the Duparc family.  The Creole plantation houses were distinguishable from the Mississippi river by their bright colors.  White plantation houses were noted to be inhabited by English settlers. 


Front of the raised plantation house.
One notable feature of this family is that is was the women who ran the family sugar cane business through the centuries.  Our tour guide told of one of the early women in the family marrying a French man right off of the boat.  Her business arrangement with him was that she would retain all of her property and business holdings.  She would also take control of his property and business holdings.  What was hers was hers and what was his was to be hers.  She began shipping wine, from his family's vineyard in France, straight to her house next to the Mississippi river.  Old wine bottles are used for garden edging throughout the property. 


 
The house has retained many family furnishings. 
Family bedroom
 
 
The grounds of this home are meticulous. 
 

French garden given to Laura LoCoul for her birthday. Recreated by the local historical society. 

 
The house is very, "real".  It is not overdone in any movie type of decorating style.  
Ladies Parlor        Please note the authentic sugar chest in front of the window.
 
 
Our guide made special note that we understood that this plantation was run as a family business.  Each, "president", as they called themselves chose their next successor.  Throughout this family's history, women succeeded women.
 

Family dining room

 
The plantation still has several slave cabins in existence and were used for housing until the 1970's.  The issue of slavery was addressed during our tour and it was not glossed over.  The Code Noir was discussed as well as their harsh daily schedule. 


Slave quarters
 
It was in these slave quarters that the Bre'r Rabbit Tales are said to have come about. 
 

"Retirement" home in the rear of the property.

There is so much to say about this visit, and it truly leaves me at a loss for words,  but if you are really interested in the history, and there is a lot of it, I suggest you visit their website here. 

And, if you are ever in the area, they do also give daily tours in French :)

 
 


Comments

  1. All that history in one house. Amazing place.

    ReplyDelete
  2. i really enjoyed this post...this would probably be the highlight of the trip for me to. i've been to the joel harris cabin in georgia where he wrote the uncle remus stories...i love all that history too! i have a bootleg copy of song of the south i got off ebay :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love touring the old plantation homes in Louisiana. The history takes you back so far into the life of this country. Thanks for sharing this place with us.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Unusual social customs and gender relations to say the least... Still I'm with your kids on most interesting. You just can't beat a good swamp buggy and lotsa critters. :)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Looks great...love that dinning room.

    ReplyDelete
  6. what a fabulous house. and such interesting tidbits about the business, and the women, and the "Code Noir"

    ReplyDelete
  7. A fascinating place, I would really like to visit this plantation!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Isn't it fun to visit the old homes and plantations? Great post. Thanks for sharing with us.

    ReplyDelete
  9. What a beautiful plantation, it sounds like you had a great trip!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Enjoyed the last three posts and your visit to New Orleans. I would love to tour the Laura Plantation. Maybe I will get to someday, but thankful that you gave us a little of the history too. I have always loved stories of the south.
    The French Market looks wonderful too.
    I'm happy to have just the pictures of your swamp experience. That rodent...whatever it was is enough to keep me far, far, away.
    How great that you take you and your family get to experience those things together.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Oh this place does have beautiful landscape and the history is amazing. I am so happy they did not gloss over any of the history. I like the deal the original woman made:) B

    ReplyDelete
  12. Fascinating, Michelle. I'd love to visit this plantation.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hi Michelle, This must have been a fantastic visit. Great pictures and thanks for sharing. Also, thanks for kind comment on John's Island yesterday. Take care and have a great day! John

    ReplyDelete
  14. Hi Michelle, It's like going back in time, when watching your pictures ... I came to think about the history of "Gone with the WInd" (my favourite movie from my childhood :) ... This visit must have been a very special experience, as well as the sail-tour with the exotic blue boat in the dream-like surroundings!
    Thank you for sharing your tour!
    Nina

    ReplyDelete
  15. Beautiful photos and history...right up my alley...I would love to see it!

    ReplyDelete
  16. What a wonderful tour. The house is amazing.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Sounds like an awesome place and your photos are so nice.

    ReplyDelete
  18. Looks like you guys had a wonderful vacation. History and alligators!

    ReplyDelete
  19. I’ve just been scrolling through all your posts from your trip and this is my favourite one yet. I really love the picture of the slave quarters. I can’t wait to visit this one day (hopefully in the not-too-distant future)!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Love this and of course the name. How fascinating that the women were in charge at that time in history.
    Laura

    ReplyDelete
  21. I can see why you enjoyed it so much...beautiful

    ReplyDelete
  22. what a cool place. so neat. need to get back down there & see it. wow!! ( :

    ReplyDelete
  23. An amazing structure -- love the yellow color especially.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts