Sunday, June 2, 2013

Good Girls



A few days ago I opened up the hives to make sure that the queens had been released and that generally all seemed well.

Here are the Italian Bees around a bit of burr comb between two frames that are a bit too far apart.  Burr comb is just extra comb, or comb where it doesn't need to be.  You want the bees putting the comb, and their effort, into the frames.  



Here is one of the queen cages.  You can see the opening on the end, by my glove.  The piece of comb hanging off of the end is a good example of burr comb.  This can be scraped off and saved to make creams, lip balm, etc...





Right now, while there isn't a lot of flowers/plants available for the bees to feed from, I make sugar syrup for them to eat.  The liquid is poured into the top of this tray and the bees enter into the covered dome on top.  Small bits of syrup flow into the dome for the bees.  



Things seemed fine and the Italian girls were just all over the place.  Not aggressive, but very busy.  The Russian bees seemed a bit more methodical in the hive and very unfazed by my presence. 

While my dad was visiting this week he liked to watch the bees.  He would pull up a camp stool next to the hives and just watch their behavior.  

I think he needs a hive of his own.....


42 comments:

  1. glad they're doing well and adjusting! russian bees more methodical. kind of interesting to know they have such different behaviors!

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  2. It is so cool to see this whole process up close and personal. Between the Italian and Russian contingents, you have a whole united nations of bees!

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  3. :-) all is well in bee land!

    Love your new header!

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  4. I enjoyed this post and your photos. That's great that your dad enjoyed watching them so. My daddy always loved watching the hummingbirds on our lantana bush!

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  5. Loved seeing your pictures of the bees...very interesting to me, a 'honey lover'!

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  6. I find this bees fascinating although i do not know much about them but hope to learn though your blog. Many thanks. Margaret

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  7. Now how cool is this?!?!?! I think I would set a stool right beside your dad's and watch with him. I didn't know you kept bees. You are a Miss Jill of all Trades :-) Special points for working with bees AND taking pictures at the same time! Trying to get back in the grove of reading everyone's blog posts. Now that the girls are out of school, life is more relaxed but still hectic if that makes sense????

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  8. I've loved following your bee project. I remember my Great Grandfather having two bee hives. Your posts bring back a lot of memories.

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  9. I love learning more about bees from you, thank you, have a super week ahead!

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  10. We are at the same stage...However, it looks like we may have some "robbing" the bees became aggressive (Italian bees) and there was mortal combat going on in front of the hive- My son is planning on reducing the entrance-

    Your bees are rocking! I find beekeeping fascinating.

    Velva

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  11. Fascinating! I'm starting to see some of the reasons so many people are getting into raising bees...besides helping the bee populations and having your own, fresh honey...they're so interesting and fun to watch. That piece of burr comb is beautiful! It's so clean and perfect. Thank you for sharing such a great post!

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  12. Love reading about your bees. Thanks so much for sharing :)

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  13. Happy all is well in bee keeping, so interesting, Francine.

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  14. I was just telling my husband this afternoon, how I would love to be able to watch the bees and to watch someone gather the honey. Sam is a stronger believer in eating local honey to head off allergies......so we purchased a gallon of honey today from a local man. Wow...this stuff is certainly not cheap...
    Have a great week.

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  15. I love to see your bees! Our bees "vamoosed" last year. Hope to get some more next spring though. :)

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  16. That is so interesting. I would love to start a hive but I doubt my neighbors would be thrilled.

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  17. I like bees but don't like honey much, too sweet.
    Merle..............

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  18. How fascinating! I don't know much about bees but recently, there has been a big drive to save the bee population in the UK (which seems to be dwindling). I've been wanting to learn more about them!

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  19. Gosh! They are busy!:)

    Happy new week!

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  20. Sounds like you have everything well under control. :)

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  21. Good job! The effort will be so worth it!

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  22. I'm glad things are going well! We are collecting all the burr comb we scrape off and will hopefully have enough to melt down for a few projects at the end of the season.

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  23. I am, as always, scared and fascinated by your bee reportage. Glad to know that the Italian bees keep behaving like Italians...

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  24. I look forward of following the process, and seeing how / where the Honey is tipping, and also the Wax ... My mom is making face cream with the bee Wax, cocos oli and some of the oil from the orange calendula flowers - it is the best cream for night time I've had!

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  25. I wish I could do hives, but I don't know how much work they are and I wouldn't want to neglect them. I find them to be a fascinating little creature!

    Have you read The Secret Life of Bees? It's a great book, and a really good movie!

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  26. Love to these those who take interest in the bees! Like a lot of things, they are going away and that ain't good! Thank you for having such an important interest to the environment and health! Blessings~~~Roxie p.s. I think your name for the trailer was so sassy cute!

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  27. It is so interesting for me to follow this strange process.

    And, of course, Fathers Day is coming up soon. I think I know what Dad is going to get . . .

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  28. Lovely pictures! And so interesting!
    Have a nice week
    Elisa, Argentina
    http://elisaserendipity.blogspot.com

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  29. It's interesting that bees have different cultures and behaviors much like we do.

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  30. Fascinating, Michelle! But you are one brave girl! I am getting the shivers..... I do love that honey! xo

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  31. Bee keeping looks interesting, Michelle, and I like that you have a little United Nations of bees in your hives! I bet the honey you harvest will taste so good. I've paid a lot for lavender honey -- I love its special flavor.

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  32. Oh Michelle I would be sitting with your Dad watching too. I am so happy he and you get to spend these days together just watching the world buzz by together:) B

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  33. Fascinating! I didn't know you could supplement their diet with sugar water.

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  34. SO! SO! Cool Michelle! I am so intrigued by this!

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  35. Glad to see they're doing well. Great pics and yes, your dad needs some bees. : )

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  36. Nice to see the progress. Methodical Russians ... LOL. I didn't realise that you had to feed them as well ... business plan a little way off then ?!

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  37. :-D I just happened across your blog, and et voila, BEES! I am a beekeeper too, so anything apiary I am all over! Good luck with your girls, and I am off to read some more of your blog!

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