Makin' Hay While the Sun Shines

A couple of weekends ago we spent some time at a ballpark. More precisely a twelve-hour stint on a Saturday.

 That is a long day at a ballpark, just sayin'.

 Just an example of the remote location of the ballpark is the following picture.  During the day a handful of gentlemen farmers baled hay, right beside the park.  

 All.day.long.



Typically these days farmers, around here, roll their hay.  It is fairly rare to see baled hay in the fields. A roll  of hay is equal to approximately ten-to-twelve bales.  Easy to see why rolling is more efficient.  

I couldn't help but think that the tractor and baler looked just like toy farm machinery, complete with the plastic bales of hay.  





"My father kept me busy from dawn until dusk when I was a kid.  When I wasn't pitching hay, hauling corn or running a tractor, I was heaving a baseball into his mitt behind the barn....If all the parents in the country followed his rule, juvenile delinquency would be cut in half in a year's time."

Bob Feller 



Comments

  1. Baling hay or rolling hay is hard work. As is twelve hours on the ball field (smile).


    Happy summer.

    Velva

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  2. i LOVE when i see square bales! even rarer here in texas (beef cattle country). i buy horse hay in sq. bales at the feed store as it's easy for me to store and feed w/o them eating all.day.long!

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  3. Afternoon Michelle, I also love the smaller square bales, just look better I think.....Happy Summer, Francine.

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  4. It was such a different time when kids helped out on the farm. I do believe they were too tired to get into much mischief.

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  5. I can almost smell the bales! Have hefted a few in my day. What a great thing to see and experience.

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  6. Thanks for these pictures...this is the way we bale our hay when we can. It's much easier for us to handle these bales, although it's much less labor intensive...and much faster to make the round bales! It is hard, hot work, for sure. :)

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  7. Love Bob Feller's quote at the end.

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  8. When they get that wagon full, have them send about 300 squares my way! winter isn't too far away. 12 hours at a ball park? WOW!

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  9. I can remember the long hot summer days stacking hay bales on the wagon and when unloading the wagons and stacking them in the barn. I still have to laugh about when my farmer buddy got their first round baler and he said we weren't ever going to touch another hay bale. Lol.

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  10. that is a lot of hay! we usually see it rolled, too!

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  11. I don't think I could last 12 hours at the ball park.
    We don't see many square bales around here anymore,especially near a ball park. :)

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  12. My Dad's baler made the small bales- I never had to help with haying but my brother did. It was so much fun climbing all over the bales stacked in the barn! :)

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  13. My son helped his father bale hay today. He's been doing it since he was ten. There isn't a huge area to bale but I love the smell of it and my son is doing something he will remember and cherish. There isn't too much of it in our area anymore.....Enjoyed! Blessings~~~Roxie

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  14. We finally had at least 5 days in a row when hay could be cut, dried and baled. Last year was a disaster. I've never used anything but square bales.

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  15. My sister and her husband still put up square bales - they're getting to put up the first crop before the 4th of July - moved equipment to my parents' fields today.
    The kids LOVE to ride the rack, and the older boys enjoy the work out. :)

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  16. Amen that twelve hours would be a LONG time in a ball park. Farmers are to be admired....so much work!!!

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  17. This is something that I've always dreamt of doing!

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  18. Hi Michelle I remember making 'haystacks'!!!Now that was some time ago. Great quote at end. Yes if that was still in operation there would be less crime and more fun. Margaret

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  19. I admire farmers for all of the hard work that they do and the long hours they put in doing it.

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  20. Oh I could watch farmers do square bales all day long. I prefer baling from the air conditioned seat of my tractor and rolling them out of the baler. I do appreciate how hard the work is. We have not started yet but it is getting hot quickly so anytime now. Great shot. B

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  21. You are right, it is rare to see hay bales any longer. The rolls are it! I totally agree with your statement at the end, and if we had kept our children busy working, they wouldnt have time to be in trouble. Have a wonderful day.

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  22. Yep, that's what we did all last week. Most of our bales are round, but we did bale some square ones for neighbors and cousins. Straw is next, probably right after the 4th. It's turning now; I'm just praying these summer thunderstorms we've been having move through come gently. The wind can really mess with our stand of wheat! Enjoy!

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  23. I helped bale hair as a kid! COuldn't lift the bales very well, but I learned how to drive the tractor!

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  24. Only rolled hay here now, it has been a long time since I saw the last square bales...

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  25. Twelve hours is a very long time. What a good mom you are! Luckily you brought your camera. :)

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  26. I love watching things like that too. I've always wondered how much those rolls hold as in how many bales they equal. Thanks for sharing that. I've also wondered why they never roll the hay that grows around here. They only bale it. I only see the rolls when I travel outside of California.

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  27. I love that saying. My Dad would say something similar about his life. My Dad never learned to play but he considered playing his guitar or harmonica "play". I know I loved that type of playing, for sure. Thanks for your fun comment of the "Red" shoes. Those are my favs! I hardly wear them tho, they are precious. But don't get me wrong I do wear them and always get snaps when I do. hahahahaha

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  28. That quote is so right on!!! We still have the little bales here in my little country town of Corbett, Oregon. Most people are (and I hate this term) "hobby farmers" with small holdings and just a few animals such horses, goats, sheep, etc. I like the little bales as they are more old-fashioned and easier for one person to handle. I'm off to swim.. have a good one! ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  29. I was just thinking the other day that you don't see baled hay too often anymore. Children have way too much unsupervised idle time on their hands these days. xo Laura

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  30. Oh my gosh! I remember my dad baling hay "WAY" back in the day. We would ride on the wagon, but were to young to be of any help. Dad would hire the cute neighbor boy to do stack the bales :)

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  31. We have both around our hood. For the cattle I see rolled but for the barn we use bales. That is a long day at the park... phew! yes I like summer but Fall is my fave season.

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  32. Every time I see pictures of your corner of country paradise, I want to visit it! It's so far removed from the hustle and bustle of my daily life in London! I've always been fascinated by the rolling of hay - I would have been transfixed!

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  33. Yup! That Feller could throw BBs. Yes he could. Reckon he was one mighty fine ballplayer for the Indians.

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  34. Ah,making hay, reminds me of my childhood on Dartmoor...!

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  35. A bit of variety to your day then, balls in one field and bales in the other !

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