Sunday, August 25, 2013

Tobacco Harvest


For me life is a series of cycles that make it zoom along at the speed of light.  Now that we are back in school, fields of tobacco are beginning to be harvested and hung in barns to dry.  



Although we do not grow tobacco on our farm, my husband's family grew a crop each year when he was growing up.  It is a labor intensive crop that uses time honored methods of hand cutting, hanging the stalks on sticks and placing them in barns.  




In fact the dear husband and his identical twin brother, (yes, there are two of them), grew tobacco as a way to raise money for their first car.  




It is a plant that comes with a lot of history and controversy.  



31 comments:

  1. I don't blame the plant so much as I blame the chemicals that companies have added to the final product. But still, I am glad to be an ex-smoker and wish I had never picked one up when I was a teenager.

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  2. I lived in KY for a while. I loved seeing the fields of tobacco, or hanging in the barns drying.

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  3. Thanks for the comment on my blog . It's long time I'm been on the blogs . What a pity . What a joy to see your interestin blog . I'm country woman yoy know and love the thin in country side , like this tobacco . Where you live , tobacco need warm .

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  4. I didn't imagine those plant were so huge!

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  5. I lived in NC for 2 years and remember tobacco harvest time.

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  6. We used to grow tobacco too, Michelle, but had to stop for two reasons: first, I could not breathe in the tobacco barn, and second, our consciences. I loved growing it, though--there is nothing quite like it.

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  7. way back in 1964 my family took a vacation and drove from the midwest to the east coast. On the way back to the midwest we stopped at a tobacco farm and I was given a tobacco plant to take home which I took on the school bus to show and tell. LOL It was cool because no one else in class had ever seen a tobacco plant. We lived in corn country. xox

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  8. there's a romance to it, though, for certain.

    and secret agent man has a secret agent twin?! :)

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  9. It's a wonder that it's still grown and sold as destructive as it is to those who are addicted to it. But people do this to themselves.. but it's hard to watch. Hugs, Teresa

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  10. I've never seen a field of tobacco. It isn't grown around here. You sure got some pretty pictures of it!

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  11. Beautiful photos and love the story of your husband and his twin. I'm sure this plant started out as a beneficial herb at one time.....it is a beautiful plant. xo

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  12. Connecticut is a big grower of shade grown tobacco for cigar wrappers. I took some photos last week but they probably won't make my blog post line-up.

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  13. I have never seen it in person. One day, I hope.

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  14. it is a pretty plant...wow Secret Agent twins...that could be the title of a book...

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  15. I can close my eyes and almost smell the drying tobacco. Cousins in Kentucky grew a small crop of tobacco, and I have memories of walking under the hanging tobacco, in the tobacco shed. I agree with comments above about the added chemicals in tobacco products today being the worst culprits, but I am also a former smoker, and can't stand to be around it anymore. Terrible habit. My dad died of lung cancer, as did a dear friend. A terrible way to go. But - there are those early memories of that sweet smell!!

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  16. Tobacco still remains one of the most profitable crops for farmers. Loved the photos. I don't think I have ever seen tobacco growing.

    Velva

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  17. It was coming up in odd places in our back yard for ages, they have a pretty flowers.
    Merle........

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  18. Tobacco used to be the major crop for this area of Virginia. My Dad had a 9 to 5 job, so he didn't have time to raise tobacco, but all our neighbors did. I remember handing tobacco leaves and the wonderful smell of the tobacco curing in the barns.

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  19. Hi Michelle, interesting, never seen tobacco leaves...Blessings Francine.

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  20. I miss the tobacco fields in NC but now that has been replaced by views of corn, soybeans and wheat. Lovely in a different kind of way.

    Marie Angelique

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  21. Interesting, does it smell before it's dried?

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  22. LOVE seeing the fields of tobacco....they are still a few around here. I love the history and the look of it in the fields and hanging in the barns. I've never smoked but most ole timers I knew who rolled their own, lived to be in their nineties.....makes you wonder....Have a wonderful week~~~Roxie

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  23. So interesting to see a tobacco plant. It used to be a big crop here, but is not farmed here anymore. There are still lots of tobacco pools and tobacco's sheds still standing.

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  24. That first photo was fascinating to me I have never really noticed a tobacco field before , great shot.

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  25. Great photos Michelle and such an interesting post on tobacco. One of my first trips in the U.S. I remember seeing tobacco fields in Kentucky and wandering what they were, and seeing them drying in those tall barns.

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  26. As my sister and I were driving down the road the other day we were talking about how few fields of tobacco we see anymore in Kentucky. It is a good thing if people stop smoking, but the farmers need a good replacement crop. Hemp anyone??? :)
    Hugs,
    Laura

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  27. Would that be the twins' notorious blue Sentra? Many a boy in Smalltownland bought his first car with tobacco proceeds. We traveled a lot of Saturday-night-gas-wasting-circles around Main Street one town over in those vehicles.

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  28. all i know is - your photos make it look BEAUTIFUL . . . thanks.

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  29. When I saw the title to this post, I had to read it. My first trip back to KY as an adult a few years ago was during tobacco harvesting time. Some of my family used to grow tobacco too and my cousin drove me around showing me the whole process. The barns were so interesting where they dry the tobacco. The large green leaves do have a beauty of their own.

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