Thursday, September 5, 2013

Thoughtful Thursday


What makes a barn such an iconic American image?  

Is it the romance of owning a farm? 

Perhaps it goes with the dream of homesteading.  Doing for yourself.  

Or, is it something else entirely? 

I would love to hear your thoughts......


25 comments:

  1. I think it represents independence....Our land of the free dream.

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  2. First , forgive my bad english . The picture is beautiful - colour is stunning .
    I'm country women , born here , lived almost my hole life here . I'm living my dream . Livin in the farm is something , you own the place , you have lot of space , freedom , you can do what you want .
    I'm retired now , but earlier we did farming . I'm 73 and my husband is 79 , both healthy and strong and HAPPY .
    It is romance of owning a farm . This pic makes my dreams fly bac to old times .

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  3. a throw-back to simpler times and healthy life.

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  4. The barn itself, thwlight, the dark sky, the color of the earth: everything makes this beautiful image even more striking.

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  5. I agree that it is an "American dream" to be self-sufficient and to live on land that you own. Sadly, as evidenced by all the lovely old barns and farm houses falling into disrepair everywhere you look, it is no longer an American dream that most can realize. Life was hard, but somehow simpler 'back then'. Sigh.

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  6. It's like a symbol of hard work, independence and healthy living all rolled into one.

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  7. America's history was experienced through its agricultural age.....It is embedded as part of our living history. It also represents the plight of the family farm in the modern age of big corporate farms.

    Velva

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  8. I love barns and post one very week on my photo blog. For me it brings back memories of my childhood on a farm. I think barns are part of Americana in a way.
    Love the one you shared!

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  9. Beautiful! It reminds me of my childhood...

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  10. It harkens us back to a simpler, gentler, hardworking time. Long past for most Americans today. I spent parts of my childhood summers on my Uncles farm. A boy from the big city who was having a great adventure....:)

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  11. For me it's the thought of the previous owners....their hard work, their trials, their triumphs....I am so intrigued by the history of structures.

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  12. I remember barns as a place where square bales were thrown off of hay wagons and it may have taken several relays of men to get them to the top of the stack. The place smelled of fresh sweet hay of sweat and hay dust and bee nests. There were hundreds of tie ropes hung over the stalls by the end of winter where the hay had been fed and the rope saved for some unknown use, maybe to tie up tomatoes. Now there is just spiders and dried manure, all the old men are gone now as are the square bales. They roll the hay and leave it setting in the rain. Barns were a thing done right when right mattered.

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  13. As a kid I spent hours working and playing in old barns. As I got older I was amazed at the amount of manual labor that went into their construction. Nothing says American as an old post and peg barn.

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  14. a reminder of simpler times...but hard work...the thought of barn raising...when families and neighbors got together to help each other...and barn dances...with fiddles...and dancing...beautiful photos...

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  15. What is it about old barns? I have loved them my whole life. I always wonder about their histories, the families who built them. This is a great photo!

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  16. Childhood memories. And knowing my grandparents all worked to have farms, it makes me appreciate them.

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  17. Beautiful light. Make for a warm feeling photo.

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  18. I think you will find it's the same everywhere, small farms are being sold to big companies and everything is done on a large scale and run by big industries. small farms are no more unless they are hobby farms owned by people who go and visit a few times a year but don't run working farms.
    Merle...............

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  19. The question has already been answered, this is a beauty!

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  20. Barns make for a simpler life, feeling of freedom, healthy living, outside with fresh air in your lungs, beauty of its surroundings adn rusitc feel. Lovely shot in great lighting conditions.

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  21. I grew up in cowboy and cattle country (western canada) so a fair number of barns which was good for city kids if one was lucky enough to have family ranch owners or friends of the families with barns that were just there for kids, your beautiful photo is representative of a simple, perhaps even nicer time.

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  22. I think American bars is one of those homey visuals which remind of us a group of hard working individuals - the American farmers. They also remind me of being raised in an era and place where farm life was a vital part of surviving. My grandparents had chickens and pigs when I was a kid. They grew a garden for many years until they were way up in years. They loved it! I have happy memories of such times and am blessed to be apart of such sweet times. Thanks for sharing such a beautiful reminder of my past! BTW, be sure to come by my blog to enter my Diamond Candles giveaway that went live yesterday. Just click on the link: here!

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  23. Nostalgia...I've witnessed several barns torn down or burned (accidentally) this summer, so I'm really noticing and photographing them now. My Rurality: http://lauriekazmierczak.com/pommel/

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  24. I think it is the simplicity. Barns have simple, functional, utilitarian architecture.

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  25. So many wonderful answers. The barns in Australia tend to be much smaller and different - more rustic.

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