Thursday, August 28, 2014

Thankful Thursday



Thankful this Thursday for green pastures.  Though our weather patterns have been strange this summer, we still have plenty of green to go around.  This shot is of a local farmer's tobacco crop, just up the road from us.  This tobacco is ready to be cut and placed on a stick, that will allow it to hang in a barn to dry.  

"I'd rather kiss a mad cow on the muzzle then a smoker on the mouth." 

Paul Carvel  


Linking up with Teresa today....


36 comments:

  1. It is disheartening to see all that tobacco growing...but I guess there's lots of money in it.
    Great photo.

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  2. Still very green here too, but we've had buckets of rain the past month.

    Funny quote!

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  3. We all need to enjoy the green as long as we can, because we know what is around the corner, and it will all be brown. As for your quote, I agree...yuk

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  4. Tobacco smells so good when it is curing, a lot better when it is wrapped in chemical coated paper and burnt for sure. Kind of the same sweet smell as fresh hay in the barn back when they still put it in barns that is.

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  5. Strange to see tobacco crops growing.
    I used to smoke 40 a day but gave up years ago - that is why I am alive.

    The quotation is very if not a little extreme - but thank goodness I stopped smoking . . . . lol
    Cheers ~ Eddie

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  6. Great photo and the quote is fabulous!
    Like how you roll thankful and fence into one . . .
    In fact . . . I like your minimal way . . . in your posts . . .

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  7. I love these decorating ideas. The designs are so vibrant and the view is so happy and cheerful.
    England Model House

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  8. My guess is that Heidi is NOT a smoker. Maybe she'll call today and tell me. Fingers crossed.

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  9. thanks for explaining the crop! i looked at the wagon and it almost looked like one we used for square bales in wisconsin, but i couldn't figure out the crop. :)

    thanks for linking, michelle!

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  10. Tobacco was a main crop in the southern part of Wisconsin years ago. I would never kiss a mad cow, no matter what. A horse? Yeah, probably. LOL

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  11. Love the picture, Michelle, and the quote made me giggle :) Have a fabulous day!

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  12. Ha! LOVE the quote you chose to accompany this photo.

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  13. Ouch! Now I will have that image in my mind all day! :-{

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  14. Thats a nice composition, and a lot of tobacco! I love the quote, but I wouldn't kiss either,

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  15. Wonderful fence and tobacco shot. Love your quote and agree wholeheartedly.

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  16. No way, I kiss a smoker every day...

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  17. Great photo Michelle. It has been a long time since I drove through tobacco fields. The drying sheds used to fascinate me with their shape.

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  18. Oh gosh, I used to love the smell of the tobacco being smoke dried in the barns when I was growing up.

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  19. I LOVE this post. Such a pretty picture of the tobacco field. When I was a little girl, my sister built a house outside of Versailles KY (horse county, now). They were the first to build in a small development of 10 houses. All the fields surrounding her place were covered in tobacco fields. Nearly every farm had a garden area with a portion dedicated to tobacco, as well. I guess for personal use. Now the area is surround by large, VERY large, horse ranches. I seldom see tobacco fields anymore, and that is a good thing.

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  20. LOL! Me too! I was trying to guess what crop that was before I read the post and couldn't figure it out. Cabbage?? Well, now I know...

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  21. the tobacco is turning yellow in my area too. great image Michelle.

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  22. hey Michelle! Yes, wisdom comes after the mistake. It like God's way of saying "excuse me, now you won't be doing that again, now will we?" It does!!!

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  23. Hi Michelle, I had to laugh about the combination of the photo (great) and the quotation (also great) but they do express somewhat different sentiments, don't they? Have a great weekend and holiday! John

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  24. So pretty in the field.. so detrimental to it's users. I'm off to volunteer at Multnomah Falls today. I bet there is not much water coming over!
    ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  25. I've never seen Tabaco growing in a field before. It's very fascinating to see. Great photo.

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  26. Shade-grown tobacco is grown in greater Hartford, along the Connecticut River, where the soil is very risk from periodic flooding. Most Connecticut tobacco is used for cigar wrappers. As one who has never smoked, I dislike everything about smoking, although I love the beauty of fields of tobacco against the traditional red hanging barns. Can I reconcile the two thoughts? No. A few inconsistencies are OK.

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  27. So what will he grow when everyone has stopped smoking?

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  28. I have memories of walking under the drying tobacco, at my Uncle's little farmette, in Kentucky. The smell is amazing.

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  29. Hubby and I were driving backroads in the Smokies in the late 1960's. Could not figure our why there were so many cabbage plants in all the fields. Duh, tobacco we finally realized.

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  30. I like the patchwork colors of the fields - it's really pretty. The quote is funny :)

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  31. Your tobacco looks a little short this year too! I'm surprised as we've had so much rain. Maybe too much or else the cool July. Wouldn't want to be cutting or hanging right now :-o.

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  32. I always find it fun to see crops that grow in other parts of the country. Here it's corn, soybeans, and hay. A very occasional odd field of wheat.

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  33. Beautiful scenery - You live in such a beautiful place, Michelle! I have never seen a tobacco plant "live" before ... I wonder when that's going to be? :-)

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