Tebbs Bend



With such a busy family schedule during this time of year, there isn't much time for extra activities or leisurely pursuits.  However, last Sunday I took an hour out of my morning to make a quick trip to the Tebbs Bend Battlefield.  



Formed in a driving loop off the side of the highway, Tebbs Bend is a Civil War historical area where people still live and farm the land.  The Battle of Tebbs Bend was fought on July 4, 1863.  General John Hunt Morgan attacked Union Army troops, but was defeated, even though he had the advantage.  



The part that I really wanted to see was the steel bridge built in 1907.  About a month ago, it was closed to traffic.....forever.  It will be moved and preserved, but many people in the area have been upset by the closure.  



General John Hunt Morgan burned the original wooden bridge during his Christmas raid in 1862.  The wooden bridge was repaired and improved more after the Battle at Tebbs Bend.  It is believed that this steel bridge is built on the original stone abutments.  


Yes, I did walk over the barricades onto the wooden slats.  




They seemed a bit precarious just walking on them, I cannot imagine driving over this bridge.  



A wonderful area of history that I will be visiting again.  Some say the area, and this bridge, are haunted.  I don't know about that, but there is still a lot here for me to investigate.  






Comments

  1. glad you went to see it before they start tearing it up to move it.

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  2. We used to have a lot of bridges like that one but they are mostly gone now. If we would use the same type of construction for today's bridges they wouldn't need to be rebuilt every couple decades.

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  3. I enjoyed this bit of History this morning. I hope you get even more photos....

    Enjoy this beautiful Sunday!

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  4. The steel bridge is beautiful. We have a couple of those old ones here as well, simply deteriorating away.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  5. What a hauntingly beautiful place.. I would have walked out there too. Too bad they don't fix it up and keep it. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  6. Two things I like... history and old bridges.

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  7. I too love bridges and history, thanks for sharing!

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  8. It is a beautiful area to explore. shame about the bridge. we had one not far from our home too and the removed it and built a concrete one in its place.

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  9. Enjoy going to places like this and the pictures are great.

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  10. Hi Michelle, A lovely area for a walk. Hope your week goes smoothly.

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  11. A very good find this old bridge. I would be going back too. Great pictures of it :)

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  12. Wonderful old. BRIdge, what a shame..Blessings Francine.

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  13. A better solution would have been to leave it in place and plant it with flowers (see http://hartforddailyphoto.blogspot.com/2011/09/bridge-of-flowers.html) and build a suitable modern one a bit upriver.

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  14. There is some kind of eerie feeling around there ! especially if one is alone !

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  15. Historical places like that give me goose bumps. What a great place to get to visit, and the 'haunted' bridge is pretty amazing. I love stuff like this. Thanks for sharing!

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  16. Visiting old battlefields always makes me thoughtful. To my shame, I had never heard of Tebbs Bend before. I see there was a well attended ceremony to mark its 150th anniversary. I'm not sure I would have risked crossing that bridge - those slats look pretty dodgy to me! But at least it's being preserved - which is better than the alternative when it comes to items of significant merit and interest! Thanks very much for the insight, and for your visit to my blog.

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  17. So glad you showed this historial place and bridge, it's just a shame it is going to be moved.

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  18. I hate that another of our beautiful iron bridges is being moved. I agree with what Jack says. xo Laura

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  19. What a beautiful place! hope the school year is going well!

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  20. Thank you so much for taking that hour out of your busy and sharing it with us. Beautiful. Hug B

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  21. I would be numbered among those that hated to see the bridge moved! It is an old beauty. Would be nice for Rubbish Tuesday.

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  22. Thanks for that brief historical trip and the bridge shots. I bet this area in darkeness just adds to the 'haunting' allure.

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  23. this is living, i don't like being too busy for life!!! the bridge is especially beautiful!!!!!!!

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  24. Michelle...what an absolutely beautiful place for a photo shoot! We had a few old bridges like that around where I grew up in Ohio and I was always afraid to cross them in a car...I even had bad dreams about them. Today, I find them so very cool! Great post!

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  25. A wonderful post... many thanks for sharing your history.

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  26. Hmmm. If the bridge is not safe, I wonder why the locals are upset. Safety first, I think.

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  27. I love seeing, and photographing, historical relics like this bridge! I can't imagine wanting to drive over it as I would think it is unstable. I hope it will be preserved.

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  28. Thank you for showing this beautiful steel bridge Michelle.....My husband and I LOVE old bridges..wooden or steel. We've made several road trips looking for bridges....enjoyed very much. Blessings~~~Roxie

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  29. Too bad they couldn't repair it, even if only for foot traffic. Sorry to see such beautiful things go.

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  30. I grew up in the country, but have since lived in big cities for most of my adult life. Your lovely pics brought me a sense of peace and happiness just by looking at the greenery.

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  31. Michelle - Old bridges are really large antiques that are our past. I bet with a bit of investigation you could find out lots about what this bridge meant to the area. -- barbara

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  32. It doesn't look beyond repair for a footbridge, I hope they will find a way to fix it!

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  33. Gorgeous pictures . . . loved hearing about the past, the story.
    I would have walked on the bridge too . . .

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  34. I agree with VP, surely it could be converted to foot traffic only.

    Diana

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  35. I love stories and relics of the past, and am married to a history & war buff - what an intriguing post!
    The steel bridge that crossed the Mississippi River in the tiny town (of 50 or less) that I grew up near, was torn down about a decade or so ago. It was a huge icon to the surrounding community, and many were so sad to see it go, one of the last of it's kind in our region.
    It was rebuilt and is safer, but much less cool looking now.
    I would hope that with the history literally supporting this one, it could be restored in it's place and kept as a footbridge. I don't know the situation though - who travels it and for what purpose.

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  36. Preservation has to be a good thing although It would be a shame to take it away. Probably too expensive to preserve it as it stands as it's meant to serve a function. but maybe compromise the original design.

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