Sunday, October 26, 2014

Black Walnuts


Its life no doubt began before our old farmhouse was built,
this Black Walnut tree seems to be delivering a bumper crop this season.   



If you believe in old wives tales, this would seem to mean that we are going to have a bad winter.  




If you are familiar with Black Walnuts, then you know they are quite a pain to harvest.  The pretty, green ball hanging from the tree must be dried and then opened to then reveal the nut still in the shell.  Maybe when I retire I will have time to take on this project.....or maybe not.  





High in omega-3 fatty acids, walnuts are especially good for you.  Though this health benefit intrigues me, I am content to leave them right where they are.  





39 comments:

  1. and the squirrels and other critters thank you. several other bloggers have reported bumper crops of acorns, too. could be bad...

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  2. I did a post on Friday about the way above normal crop of acorns we have. I'm worried about the winter!

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  3. How about I come and pick 'em for you? For a fair share of course. I've never seen a walnut tree. :-{

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  4. Yes I've noticed we have a bumper crop of walnuts this year too and acorns too which i've also heard means we are to have a bad winter....we shall see. pretty images.

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  5. Hi Michelle, Great pictures. As to time to take on the project, my experience would indicate "probably not." Ha ha! Wishing you a great week ahead. John

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  6. And, black walnuts have a distinct flavor which is quite different from English walnuts.

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  7. I have never seen them in this stage before. In fact today we were walking and spotted a tree with what looks exactly like your walnut tree. I mean, identical. I wonder if it is a walnut tree. Great shots, it really is a beautiful tree.

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  8. I've not seen a black walnut tree before. Macadamias also come in a fibrous husk which needs to dry and crack open before revealing the hard shelled nut inside.

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  9. I didn't know they were so pretty before they are harvested! And I understand why you're leaving them for later. My retired country woman to do list is getting longer and longer.

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  10. I am not familiar with the Black Walnut tree, I no not believe they grow here in Maine...I do know of rug hookers who use this nut to dye wool...in a powered form...I bet you could cash in!!! Warm greetings from Maine...

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  11. Our walnut trees here in VA are like that too...loaded! Black walnuts are the best, but they are such a pain to crack and pick! :)

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  12. Hi Michelle, We have an old, HUGE walnut tree in the back yard....it too, has a bumper crop of green balls as big as apples!! We have many squirrels and they have been "busy" with them. I have been reading about harvesting them myself....I may try a handful this year. I didn't know about the wise tales....the squirrels are taking care of my acorns also....Blessings~~~Roxie

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  13. I love walnuts but I've never seen a walnut tree nor did i realize how difficult they are to harvest. Here, in upstate NY I was hoping for a little less snow than last year and maybe not as cold. We had temps as low as -6. I think I'll choose not to believe that old wives tale! Have a lovely week. Susan

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  14. Nothing like Black Walnut Ice Cream.

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  15. It does sound work intensive, Michelle. We love shelled walnuts and eat them as a snack frequently. We were recently in Arizona for a family wedding ad my husband picked a big bag of green olives from a tree to cure at home. I'll post a blog about them when they are ready in in a few weeks.

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  16. yes very interesting to see them like that. I have never tasted a black walnut either.

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  17. Love walnuts. Too cold for them in our part of the world, though. And aren't Old Wives' Tales and other folklore great?!

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  18. neat photos, our Walnut trees (the areas) do not loose their leaves like this until long after the fruit has dropped or is harvested, interesting difference across the Atlantic.

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  19. I think there might be some critters around that will enjoy those Black Walnuts.
    Our property in Wisconsin had several large old black walnut trees. One day someone stopped by offering some big bucks to cut all the trees for the wood. Temping but we didn't take.

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  20. I love walnuts, but to get them seems more complicate than I imagined...

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  21. we had a few at our last house...they were quite a pain when they'd fall out of the tree and i swear the squirrels would throw them at us!

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  22. Did not know this...thanks for sharing.

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  23. Beautiful photos! Never knew anything about walnut trees so I just learned a couple of things! :-)

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  24. Don't blame you for not wanting to harvest these tough nuts to crack. But damn do they taste good in fudge :))

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  25. I have harvested black walnuts before. Never again! They look like ornaments when still on the trees.

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  26. Heehee....done that and don't want to do it again... I just buy mine shelled.

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  27. I'm content to leave them, too. Although I love walnuts, I can't eat black walnuts. Too bitter. The squirrels are welcome to them :)

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  28. We have a few walnut trees, but the casing doesn't look like that and they fall and turn black on the ground before the leaves drop. Ours are just regular looking walnuts. The kids toss them out into the road and watch cars run over them. :-) ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  29. Oh and they make the best ice cream too! Don't feel bad, I have several softshell pecan trees that drop pecans happily all over my property. I figure they will be there when I am ready to take them on someday...in the meantime, they are nice snacks in the Fall when I work in the yard. :)

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  30. LOVE walnuts, hate the little rocks to pack up...
    But I don't mind buying a bag of them around Christmas time and picking them out.

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  31. I don't think these grow in NM, where I live now, but I remember them in NY when I was kid. I never knew what they were, though. I think I thought they were chestnuts. Thank you for sharing, I'm glad to finally know what they were.

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  32. I don't think I've tasted black walnuts are they good.
    Merle..........

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  33. Black walnuts are delicious. But I know what you mean. They're a pain to get to use. We had a butternut tree that was the same. Had to lay all the butternuts out on the attic floor till dry, then hit that tough shell with a sledge hammer to get them open, then hope there was some nut left. Lol

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  34. Michelle, honey, go get them at the grocery store. Life is too short . . .

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  35. The black walnuts look beautiful in their mother tree. When I lived in KY a neighbor told me to just run over the shells with your pickup or car -- "at least," he said "that's how I shell them." There you go -- the KY way! --- barbara

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  36. I feel you pain....we have black walnut trees. Can't mow the lawn without moving 5 or 6 wheelbarrows full!

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  37. They are pretty right on the tree! Hope the old wive's tale does not come true!

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  38. I also have black walnuts and have heard about shelling them with a car. Or at least getting rid of the green outer part. But I buy my walnuts from the store already shelled in a nice plastic package. Life is too short.

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  39. I like to see them on the tree, but it is a pain to get through all that to the nut. I eat walnuts occasionally, but pecans and almonds are my favorites.

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