Sunday, November 23, 2014

Thanksgiving 50 Ways

Artistic rendering of porch pumpkin.  

Last night my husband's extended family gathered at a local fire department to celebrate Thanksgiving.  My father-in-law grew up in a family of nine children, so there are family members to spare.  So many that is it simpler to congregate at a local hall, then to overflow someones house.  

My men spent the day on a pheasant hunt, while we women went to the movies.  We were all ready for the Thanksgiving spread at supper time.  The usual turkey, dressing, deviled eggs, and mashed potatoes, sat side by side with cornbread salad, cheese ball snacks, and a wide variety of desserts.  

It was good.....very good.  

So, here in Kentucky things seem be still be pretty traditional.  We might throw in an occasional holiday ham once in a while, but other than that we stick with the regular stuff.  But, what about other states?  The New York Times has a United States of Thanksgiving article that allows you to find your state and see just what is considered proper fare.  

Pocket Dressing for Kentucky?  Yep, I can go with that.  Nothing like the matriarch of the family leaving a thumbprint in your food to hold a spot of gravy.  And I had to find North Dakota, the state where I spent many years in my youth.  Lefse!!!!!  My favorite Norwegian snack as a kid.  Nothing says happiness like a cold potato pancake with butter and sugar.  Seriously.  

So, take a minute and find your current state, or a state close to your heart.  Does the food ring true?  Tell me about it!




32 comments:

  1. That sounds like a great feast. We have different foods here for our traditional holidays. Of course Thanksgiving is not celebrated in Europe.

    Mersad
    Mersad Donko Photography

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  2. Morning Michelle, oh boy, sounds so tasty. Like to hear about the foods served at Thanksgiving time in the States. Blessings Francine.

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  3. turkey tamales popped up right away for texas. a local hole-in-the-wall place here sells turkey and dressing tamales at this time of the year. can't say i've tried them. masa flour is good but gets heavy with some foods!

    wisconsin - wild rice and mushrooms? never in my house growing up.

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  4. Lefse sounds very good indeed. Canadians celebrated Thanksgiving in October, which makes sense since our harvests are earlier than yours. I think most people here celebrate with Turkey. Turkeys are big again on Christmas.

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  5. Not even close for the part of Florida where I grew up. The turkey, yes, but never fixed like that. That Cuban influence would only come into play in extreme south Florida.

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  6. Pretty spot on for Arkansas - even the giblet gravy!

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  7. It's funny how we all think our Thanksgiving feast is the perfect one. I will go check out that article, sounds fun!
    ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  8. hahhaa...it said TURKEY TAMALES for Texas and.....I. DON'T. THINK. SO.
    ewwww.....
    traditional turkey, dressing, gravy, sweet potatoes, .....all the trimmings.
    I hope your holiday is blessed...

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  9. Yikes some grape salad mess for Minnesota. I don't think so and neither did the almost 900 irate Minnesotans who commented on facebook about it.....:)

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  10. Loved the article...what gorgeous photography! They had Ohio as having pea and onion salad. I've heard of it but never had it, so I guess it's fitting for Ohio. The others listed were homemade noodles, corn casserole...both of which I've made for thanksgiving!

    I want to try that butter cake!

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  11. I was shocked to see Turkey Tamales for Texas....I don't know who in the world came up with that, but I would say they missed it big time! My family will be feasting on Chicken and Dressing, giblet gravy, green bean casserole, mac and cheese, sweet potatoes, cream potatoes, corn on the cob, fried turkey, Ham and several desserts.

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  12. This finds me thinking MY Thanksgiving is a copy of my mothers which was a copy of her mothers who was born in England so then . . . what is my Thanksgiving all about . . .
    And this year we are invited away and it won't be MY Thanksgiving anyway . . .
    Happy Thanksgiving Day Michelle . . .

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  13. We are soooo non traditional as I always cook chicken instead of turkey. My turkeys were always dry so I switched about 20 years ago. It all looks the same, on the platter!! Otherwise we are all about traditional foods!!

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  14. You are right... Nothing quite like Lefse. My family always adds a sprinkle of cinnamon with the sugar.
    I pulled up Iowa in the article, as that is where our family gatherings always are, and found Thanksgiving cookies! They must be out there somewhere, but my family has always stuck to pies!

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  15. I read the NY Times online all the time and usually agree with what they write ,but I was embarrassed by their selection for Colorado. I dislike that everything has to be about marijuana because it is legal here. I've heard sales were way down --i t is very expensive and I think the initial allure for many is over--at least I hope so!

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  16. Love that photo - very clever. Hope you all had a great time - it's always interesting hearing about Thanksgiving this side of the Pond, particularly bearing in mind its origins!

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  17. Compared to what they have listed for California, I am coming to Kentucky! Sourdough Stuffing With Kale, Dates and Turkey Sausage...I agree with the sourdough stuffing and sausage...not the dates, kale or turkey sausage. It actually sounds tasty...but not on Thanksgiving.

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  18. Hi Michelle, Very nice post. Thanks for the link to the interesting info on specialties for each State. Wow, I'm going to have to look around for my "Glazed Shiitake Mushrooms With Bok Choy" ... amazing! :-) John

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  19. Oh, by the way, I loved your comment yesterday about the snow plow. Thank you!

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  20. Well, as I am in Kentucky I think you already know mine. Have a great week. xo Laura

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  21. Our daughter just moved to Sweden for 6 months. Would that be a Swedish treat, too? I'll have to tell her to make it for her Thanksgiving!

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  22. I would really like to enjoy Thanksgiving once, somewhere in the States... Lovely picture, by the way!

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  23. Lobster Mac and Cheese is getting BIG up here, but day for me will be turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce, squash, green beans in cream sauce, dressing cranberries, gravy, pies of all types: apple, pumpkin, pecan, mince meat and more and more and more....
    Football and zzzzzzzzzzzzz.

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  24. I am here in KY as well - and you're right, we do tend to keep things rather tradition. I hope you have a super Thanksgiving!!!

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  25. OK...I'm from Ohio and I never had English Pea and Onion Salad...lol! I was figuring it would be Oyster Dressing...something my mom always fixed for my dad...none of the rest of us liked it and we had our own pan of "regular"! Interesting info!

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  26. My mom's side fo the family is like that and we're hosting it above the city hall this Friday.
    Those get togethers are always fun! Lots of work but fun!

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  27. For Wisconsin, they have listed wild rice with mushrooms. That might be true in the northern part of the state, around Superior, but I've lived here most of my life and Thanksgiving was always turkey, sage and onion stuffing, green beans, cranberry sauce, potatoes and gravy, pumpkin and apple pies. I still love sage and onion stuffing, although I make it with gluten-free breads.

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  28. For Idaho - hassleback potatoes, growing up they were mashed with oodles of butter and heavy cream. I live in Texas now, but Idaho will always be home!

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  29. Your Thanksgiving sounds perfect to me. I saw this article last week too; mojo turkey for Florida. No thanks...I like my regular old turkey. :)
    Have a great week!!!

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