Queen Anne's Lace


Said to have been named after Queen Anne of England, Queen Anne's Lace is a common wildflower in my area.  An expert lace maker herself, Queen Anne challenged the ladies in her court to make lace that would rival the patterned flower of this plant.  No one could duplicate the queen's work.  The queen ended up pricking her finger which, legend says, is the reason for the dark dot in the middle of the white flower blossom.  



Even though it is drying up with our fall temperatures, this flower head still retains much of its detail and beauty.  





"Autumn wins you best by this
 its mute appeal to sympathy for its decay."  

Robert Browning 




Comments

  1. Morning Michelle, ilove this wild flower, fun facts to read too.Blessings Francine.

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  2. Nice! Growing up in Michigan, Queen Anne's Lace was quite abundant and I always enjoyed seeing it. Hope you had a wonderful end of summer and you're gearing up for autumn.

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  3. Love the Browning quote. The plant is smaller where I live and doesn't have the red dot in the middle.

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  4. we have a lot of that here too...interesting story about the prick on the finger!

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  5. I haven't seen that plant around these parts. Maybe I've just missed it. Interesting history!
    Brenda

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  6. We have a lot of it here too and it is lovely!

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  7. A fun legend to hear.. I do adore Queen Anne's Lace! ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  8. Thanks for the background info on Queen Anne's Lace. We have seen quite a bit of it during our walks lately and it's beautiful even when all bloomed out.

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  9. My mom has Queen Anne's Lace in her garden. I didn't know it was a wildflower as well. I always learn something from you!

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  10. I love see a bank of Queen Anne Lace blowing with the wind . . .

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  11. A pretty flower, It stays through the winter.

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  12. Oh yes...one of my favorites whether freshly bloomed out or withered up and dry. Beautiful photos!

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  13. if you look closely, it still has some beauty....which is most often the case with any flower or weed!!!

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  14. great detail. we have lots here too and I enjoy trying to capture the detail.

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  15. It's always been one of my favorites! So beautiful!

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  16. Your photo's are always so beautiful. Thanks for sharing!

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  17. It's a beautiful flower - fresh or dried. Love the quote :)

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  18. Hello Michelle!:) Great photos of a flower which grows in our fields. It's a very pretty wild flower, and the fresh flower head does look like intricate lace work. I like the quote!

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  19. There are a plenty growing growing wild here. When I was kid I was taught that if I got lost in the woods that the roots are edible. If you pull one up from the ground smell the root. It smells like carrots.

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  20. Love this flower and its simple yet exquisite beauty. Been keeping up with you through my email feeds. I've started a new blog, but have not gone public with it yet (promoting and all that "stuff"). It's called Lana's Life www.lanaslife.com hope you can stop by soon. ~Lana

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  21. It's one of my favorite "weeds". There use to be an abundance of it in the fields behind our house until we started haying it regularly.

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  22. Is there anyone who does not love Queen Anne's Lace?

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  23. We have a lot of Queen Anne's Lace in our ditches as well. I love photographing the flowers. Neat to learn that Queen Anne actually made lace!

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  24. I love Queen Anne's Lace. I think it is so delicate and intricate. Beautiful post, as always.

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