Sunday, September 25, 2016

Time for Tobacco


Tobacco is being harvested all around us.  Or, as locals say, it is being cut.  Anymore migrant workers arrive to do this task.  It is unpleasant work, to say the least, and must all be done by hand.  The Secret Agent Farmer Man, and his twin brother, raised tobacco as teenagers to pay for their first car.  




It is not common to raise anymore, but if you paid Smalltownland a visit, you would surely see it in barns, in fields, and being transported on wagons.  


Linking up with The Barn Collective.  



32 comments:

  1. That's a scene we used to see a lot more in Virginia than we do now. Actually, I can't even remember when I saw tobacco hanging to dry.

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  2. Strange that with all we know about tobacco, it's rather spooky to see it still being farmed and sold. I mean, obviously it is, but to actually see it is unsettling. Love your header - it captures well the nature of rural life.

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    1. We don't grow it, nor do we smoke, but I can tell you the growing of the product is alive and well.

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  3. I think most of the tobacco farms here have shifted to soybeans. Funny though there seem to be a lot of young kids who smoke more so than older people.

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    1. Our area still has a lot of people who smoke. We don't, in our household, but tobacco is still popular in small town america.

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  4. Interesting ... I didn't realize the leaves were so big! I wonder how hard it is to sell the dried product?

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    1. John, the plant does grow quite tall. The growers will take these leaves, after they have dried to warehouses where buyers will be waiting to purchase the tobacco. They won't have any trouble selling it.

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  5. Replies
    1. Seeing it like this seems so old-fashioned. It makes our small town seem to antiquated at times!

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  6. Great photo! Good composition!
    I remember seeing tobacco barns on some of our travels years ago.

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  7. Interesting.....would love to see this

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  8. Older people around here talk of picking tobacco leaves in the Connecticut River Valley, where wrapper tobacco used in cigars is still grown.

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    1. Jack,it is a very labor intensive product. Many farmers turned to growing more corn and soybeans years ago. Tobacco never went away, but is coming back more and more each year.

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  9. A dying crop and way of life for many. Years ago I remember seeing tobacco growing in PA and CN. Thabks Michelle for joining The Barn Collective, I hope to see you again soon.

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  10. Hello, what a great barn shot. I have never seen tobacco plants up close. It is interesting to see how it is dried. Happy Monday, enjoy your new week ahead!

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  11. I remember visiting the tobacco sheds years ago when we lived in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) Michelle, the smell alone put me off smoking ever 😊

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  12. Never saw how it was grown, maybe not a big crop anymore with people being more healthy

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  13. My ancestors farmed tobacco and cotton. You captured a really great photo.

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  14. gorgeous!!! but geez, why do people smoke?????

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    1. Debbie, I don't know!!! We don't smoke in our household, nor do we grow tobacco. However, it is still popular, (growing/smoking), in our small town.

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  15. Wnderful photos, Michelle. Times change don't they? Tobacco was once such a major part of the economy for many states but as smoking falls out of favor--and thankfully so--new crops have to replace it.

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  16. It must smell wonderful drying in the barns! Wonderful photo. I wonder who will do the harvesting if a certain someone becomes pres.?

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  17. Used to see the tobacco barns in southern md.

    Great barn picture.

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  18. It's neat looking hanging in that barn. You sure live in a pretty area. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  19. Seeing tobacco grow and being harvested is something that I look forward to experiencing one day.

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  20. i like your barn full of "backy"

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  21. I love when I drive past a barn and the wind is just right and I can smell the tobacco. Tim hates the smell, but I don't even mind being in the barns.

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  22. It's not a crop at all here any more. Southwestern Ontario used to be a big tobacco-growing area but it is totally replaced by other crops. It's surprising to hear it is making a resurgence in your area. I hardly know anyone who smokes.

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  23. Fine shot! I used to see tobacco barns when we visited the Eastern Shore but now everything is chickens and soy beans.

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