Historic Home Tour

It's a funny thing when you live in a small town, especially one that has been around for a while.  Sometimes you need a bump to the mind to remind you just how special it is.  This past weekend the Arts Council hosted a tour of historic homes.  Now, they have hosted these in the past, but it has been a few years.  This weekend they had some new ones on offer, or new to me since last time.  

First on my list was this landmark that sits on main street.  Built in 1904, is considered to be in the Colonial Revival style.  Unusual since most of our historic buildings are in the Federal architectural theme.  




This house continues to be lovingly cared for by a descendent of the original owner.  In her eighties, she likes to do her own plaster work on the walls.  


One of my favorites on the tour, this small Federal style home was built between 1815-1825.  The current owner is working to bring this home back to original condition, though much of the woodwork, including these fantastic windows, remain.  


The owner did detail that family members died of influenza in 1826, and this house, along with a multitude of acreage, was acquired by the local sheriff.  


Period furnishings, and this wonderful quilt, were on display in the house.  


Hard to believe just by looking at this house, but part of it is the original log structure that has been preserved.  The interior walls remain and are a feature of the house.  Built in 1790, the log structure sits on land that was part of a land grant available to Revolutionary War veterans.  



The house contains a twelve foot hole in the cellar that was used as a hiding place for the Underground Railroad.  A hiding spot in the attic was also discovered.  

I didn't visit all of the houses on tour.  Six houses were available for touring and at each home the owners were there to provide the history of the home.  Several of the owners lived in these homes as a child and consider it a labor of love to care for them.  


"Houses, like people, have personalities, and, like the personalities of people, they are partly molded by all that has happened to them."  

Louis Bromfield 




Comments

  1. ...caring for history is a labor of love! What a great job that would be.

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  2. We had a similar tour in our area a few years ago and it was so interesting and enjoyable! I would have loved to see these homes in person. Thanks for sharing this!

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  3. I can't even imagine what an amazing tour this was. Antebellum homes are something I've toured in the South, but these predate those. Awesome! I'm not sure whereabout you live. I have been following and commenting for a few weeks--not sure if you are aware I'm a new followers. In the spirit of blogging, it would be so nice to have you visit, although I'm not really up to date lately! :(

    Jane

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  4. I would have loved this tour . . . and appreciate the hours, energy of the restoration.

    I am sending your post on to the Baraboo Historical Society director, (not sure if that is his exact title) who lives in the home we lived in, in the late sixties, early seventies. We began the restoration. (The director and his wife are continuing the restoration.).

    I have a “Crazy Quilt” made by a family member, in the 1800’s, of my late husband. The family name, date, is on the quilt on one of the fabric pieces. (Old tie pieces were sometimes used in a crazy quilt.)

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  5. Hello, the houses are lovely. What a nice tour. I like the quote and photos. Wishing you a happy day!

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  6. Oh I love taking house tours!!

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  7. Argh, wish you'd been able to do all of them. Very neat!

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  8. These are exquisitely beautiful places!

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  9. House tours are interesting and there were annual ones on the VA eastern shore when we lived there. They were usually sponsored by a local garden club so the focus was as much on the houses as on the grounds. And you are so right about neglecting things right in your own town.

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  10. How wonderful to be able to tour these beauties Michelle!

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  11. What beautiful homes and history. It must have been wonderful listening to the people who live in them. Thanks for sharing, Michelle.

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  12. Kentucky has some amazing historical homes. xo Laura

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  13. This is the kind of history I can wrap my brain around. I love the stories that go along with the beautiful homes.
    How fun to talk to the owners and see all the things inside.

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  14. Just read the comment on my blog from you. Awwwww...you are so sweet. I've been blogging g for almost eleven years, and as much as I hate to stop following, sometimes the inactivity catches up, I didn't mean to be so blunt--believe me!!!!

    How cool you have an Abigail. Mine is a teacher also. Her wedding is three weeks aways and I'm swamped. Still chilling at the lake before the real deal steps in! lol!

    Have a great holiday!

    Jane x

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  15. Oh my gosh... I love old homes. I love the details, and the sense of who lived there, imagining their daily lives right there where I'm standing. Thanks for the tour. We moved West from MD to CO and there are very few homes here built before 1900. LeeAnna

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  16. This is awesome, would love to have participated.

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  17. Wow. The homes are so beautiful and rich in history. This is a must do for anyone who can.

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  18. Thanks for the tour. I adore learning about the history and it is wonderful that they are being cared for.

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